Flipped Learning

Recently MirandaNet Fellows have been looking at the power of Flipped Learning. This pedagogy contrasts with the conventional paradigm of schooling – rows of desks, learners facing the teacher, time neatly segmented.

Flipped Learning shows teachers how to  adapt to the possibilities offered by technologies to re-shape what we think of as learning and how it is structured. These three learning observations show how some MirandaNet professionals are facing that challenge.

  • Forest School
    Flipped Learning – Forest School, Walthamstow Christina Preston and Dennis Lundie Summary of context In 2013 at Forest the foundations of a new building will be laid that will include a Digital Learning Centre. The school development plan for the next five years that takes this new development into account has made embracing, using and becoming a leading developer in the use of modern technologies in the classroom a key aim. The school is already well equipped with approximately 900 PC’s and laptops. Each classroom ... Read More ...
  • Tideway School
    Flipped Learning at Tideway Christina Preston and Jim Fanning Summary of context Tideway is an 11-16 secondary school that serves Newhaven town and nearby coastal communities in East Sussex. It is a school of 600 students, whose specialism is technology. The new school buildings were opened in 2009, students and staff having spent the previous four years in temporary accommodation due to a devastating fire in 2005. This specialist technology college is situated in an area of deprivation and low aspiration. The staff are disappointed by ... Read More ...
  • Warden Park
    Flipped Learning Warden Park, Cuckfield, Sussex. Christina Preston and Dai Thomas, MirandaNet Fellowship Summary of context This well-resourced 11-16 mixed state academy that specialises in mathematics, ICT, modern foreign languages has 1,500 pupils and 120 teachers. The school is highly successful and has a high academic and sporting reputation in the local area. Situated in a privileged South East England rural catchment area there are fewer pupils from minority ethnic groups or requiring free school meals than the national average (4%). The school gained high ... Read More ...