BECTA

Reassembled

MirandaNet Fellows were often involved in research projects funded by Becta (British Educational Communications and Technology Agency), a public body funded by the Department for Education in the United Kingdom to oversee the procurement and use of computers in schools.Becta was closed down by the coalition government of 2010-2015. In response, Christina Preston, MirandaNet Founder, wrote an article in response, almost an obituary, summing up the loss felt by the wider community and outlining concerns about the future of professional development for technology in teaching and learning: The Demise of Becta 2010: its value on the world stage.

Here, MirandaNet has reassembled over 300 research reports, project reports and advice documents that were published by Becta.

These were undertaken by the professional community and they still have value both for current practice and to provide a starting point for future research and professional development programmes as well as an important archive of past work in educational technology.

If you know of any Becta documents that are not listed, or entries that require corrections (e.g. many are undated) please write to: editor@mirandanet.ac.uk).

  • Use the Category field to filter the list.
    You may select more than one term but that retrieves all articles matching all the selected terms (i.e an OR filter)
  • Use the Search field to search for any word, name or phrase.
    Combine a category filter and a search to find articles that match both terms (i.e. an AND filter)

Rosette

YearAbstractTitle+LinkCategory
2010With everybody in education supporting the Government’s aspiration of building a 21st century schools system with excellent teaching, the role of ICT in teaching and learning is very important.
Research now shows that technology can help to: • motivate learners and keep them engaged in learning; • improve attainment levels and raise standards; • personalise learning and give learners a voice; • make difficult and abstract concepts easier to explore; • save you time and be more efficient; • open up dialogue with parents and extend learning;
• make learners partners in their formal learning; • reach the hard-to-reach.
Your learners are already engaging with technology both in and out of school. Are you? This booklet will help you discover what it takes to become a 21st century teacher.
21st Century TeacherICT, Technology, Secondary, Primary, Teaching and Learning
2010Employers of all sizes and in all sectors are demanding more for less from their learning and development: more results, more quality, more speed, more volume and more responsiveness, but with less time, fewer resources and less inconvenience. As a result, an increasing number of employers are turning to technology to help them.
This study identified a range of evidence from employers (private and public) who reported business benefits from their use of learning technologies. The focus was on evidence that supports business-related outcomes (such as sales increase, cost savings, staff retention and so on) rather than learning inputs (such as volume, completion rates or learner satisfaction).
Delivering results with learning technologies in the workplace: Evidence for employer efficiencies and tangible business benefitsTechnology, Workplace, Collaboration, VLE, Business, Learning and Development
2010We have written this plan for practitioners, leaders and managers working in the further education (FE) and skills sector, for their representative bodies and interest groups and for national agencies and policy makers.
Chapters include: 1. Developing our plans; 2. Why learning technologies matter; 3. Efficiencies and effectiveness; 4. Sector leadership and workforce; 5. Content and digital resources; 6. Communications and networks.
Next Generation Learning: The implementation plan for 2010–2013ICT, Technology, Next Generation Learning, Further Education, VLE, Communities, Inclusion, SEN, Collaboration, Teaching and Learning, Personalised Learning, Leadership
2010Schools, colleges and skills providers must ask themselves how they will use technology to stimulate learners and offer opportunities that will support and enhance learning.
Becta provides expert advice and practical support to help you make the most of technology. This guide explains how we can help you:
• inspire learners with new engaging ways to learn; • tailor teaching and learning to individual aptitudes and needs; • build technology into continuous professional development.
Inspiring learners: Discover how technology can inspire learners to achieve moreICT, Technology, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Training Providers, Teaching and Learning, Personalised Learning, VLE, Collaboration, Communities, Professional Practice, Learning Platforms
2010This guidance is to help schools use their learning platform as part of everyday practice and is based on research and a wide range of user experience. It allows users to identify where they are, plan for next steps and to embed the use of learning platforms and other technology in everyday practice.
The framework defines five levels of development with regular review points. At each stage it describes a vision, and suggests ideas for ‘how to get there’ and ‘what it might look like’ when implemented.
Learning Platform: Steps to adoptionICT, Technology, Learning Platforms, Leadership, Teaching and Learning, VLE, Communities, Professional Practice, Parents, Esafety
2010All schools know that engaging with families and communicating with parents is important. Evidence shows that the majority of parents want to be more involved in their children’s education, but not all parents think that this is easy. It has long been accepted that parents’ engagement in their children’s learning at all stages is one of the most important factors in the success of a child at school. It also influences parents’ own relationships to learning and wider learning in the family. When used effectively, technology makes a vital contribution to learning, teaching and management. It also supports effective communication across and beyond the school. Parents can be kept informed about key areas of their child’s development and education. This helps them engage positively with their children’s learning and allows them to have more information available to them to help in constructive ways. Schools can also work with parents to manage continuity of learning during transitions and school closures. This works well when technology-based communication is established as part of the regular routine of school life.Engaging with familiesTechnology, Parents, Teaching and Learning, Learning Platforms, Collaboration
2010The need for meaningful or authentic learning to engage all young people, but particularly those who are showing limited benefits from the education system, is well established.A sense of ownership of the learning process is stimulating to all young people but can be particularly powerful when working with more able but disaffected learners.
• A Year 6 literacy session involved learners in parallel classes writing shared reports about the Antarctic on the interactive whiteboard. ...
• A set of ‘challenges’ was set for Year 7 learners such as providing a business plan to rid the school of litter. ...
• At secondary level, one school has identified a problem group of underachieving, economically disadvantaged white boys. The boys work on practical projects and are encouraged to think more widely about their career options. ...
Narrowing the gapsICT, Technology, Primary, Secondary, VLE, Collaboration, Attainment
2010The Next Generation Learning Awards provide a flavour of the excellent practice being undertaken in the FE sector. They are exemplars for others to aspire to and learn from.This year’s entrants come from a cross-section of backgrounds, showing how far and wide technology can be used to influence and improve learning. They also demonstrate how this learning has spread out into the wider world of work.

This year we also celebrate the 16 exemplar colleges and learning providers of the Technology Exemplar Network. The exemplars were chosen for their success and expertise in using technology to support learning, and their willingness to share with others. Their responsibility is to establish a network of providers in order to share this expertise and encourage innovation.
Next Generation Learning Awards 2010: Technology excellence in further education and skillsICT, Technology, Awards, Further Education, Training Providers, VLE, Collaboration, Communities, Teaching and Learning, SEN, Inclusion, Personalised Learning, Work-based Learning
2010Using technology can directly affect standards. It supports good practice in teaching and learning. It can also help with managing data held about learners and so enable more informed decision making. Technology can also affect standards indirectly by saving money through effective purchasing, sustainable investment and better environmental management of technology. Technology is not an end in itself; all schools, colleges and other learning providers need to know how to exploit it most effectively to drive improvement and raise attainment: • use technology to help learners achieve more; • plan for sustainable development; • implement technology in the most cost-effective wayRaising standards: Discover how technology helps schools, colleges and skills providers improve their performanceICT, Technology, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Teaching and Learning, Professional Development, Collaboration, Sustainability, Next Generation Learning
2010Learning providers have always had a duty of care for their learners at the heart of their policies and practice. Duty of care also includes safe use of technology. Organisations have a key role in helping learners to develop the skills they need to keep themselves safe and secure when using technology for learning, leisure and work. Assessing and understanding risks as they apply to your learners, then taking mitigating action, and empowering learners to protect themselves are key to effective safeguarding in a digital environment. This document explains the importance of e-safety in a digital world. It outlines some practical steps and advice for assessment and reducing risks for teaching and training staff.Safeguarding in a digital world 2: Guidance for curriculum managers, teachers and training staffSafeguarding, ICT, Technology, Further Education, ESafety, Protection in Practice
2010The world of work and business expects us to develop skills to use ICT confidently to promote improvements. It’s one of the quickest and easiest ways of finding information, sharing ideas and working with other people. And like everything else we’ve ever invented, from the bow and arrow onwards, it has to be used safely and responsibly. As well as the opportunities, there are also risks that we need to be aware of and guard against.Safeguarding in a digital world 1: Guidance for learnersSafeguarding, ICT, Technology, Further Education, Esafety
2010We know that effective use of technology improves learning. Research shows that schools accredited with the ICT Mark achieve better results. They are also more likely to be rated outstanding in overall effectiveness in Ofsted inspection reports. The Charter supports you on the school’s journey towards excellence in four stages. This gives your school a clear pathway from commitment to excellence, helping you to: • develop a shared vision for using technology; • plan ICT use across the curriculum; • use technology to enhance learning and support; • assess how ICT supports pupils’ learning; • ensure all staff and learners can use ICT effectively and safely; • use technology to extend learning beyond school; • make sure they have safe, secure and sustainable resources; • use technology to help learners progress and achieveTaking the journey towards excellence: Discover what benefits the Next Generation Learning Charter can bring to your schoolICT, Technology, Next Generation Learning
2010This ICT CPD Landscape study reports on Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Continuing Professional Development (CPD) programmes available to teachers in England in 2010. Data collection took place in the Autumn of 2009. Although the project findings are based on some desk-based research, the findings are mainly derived from primary data collection through traditional interviews, questionnaires and focus groups.ICT CPD Landscape: Final ReportICT, Technology, Research, Professional Development, Communities, Local Authorities, Collaboration, Leadership, VLE, ESafety
2010These cards will help you and your child to get the most out of using the internet safely and responsibly.Here’s how you can support your child’s learning with technologyTechnology, ESafety, ICT
2010Special schools have always been creative in their approach to the curriculum and individual needs of their pupils. They should adopt the same approach when using the self-review framework.The benefits of the self-review framework for special schoolsICT, Technology, SEN, Teaching and Learning, Personalised Learning, VLE, Professional Development, Self-Review Framework
2010Using technology together as a family can make a major difference to a learner’s achievements. But it can also bring about wider benefits. Encouraging family and informal learning can be a stepping stone to further learning, qualifications and more rewarding work.ImpaCT2: Pupils’ and Teachers’ Perceptions of ICT in the Home, School and CommunityICT, Technology, Parents
2010The evidence is now clearly established that technology can substantially increase the efficiency and effectiveness of colleges and lead to a significant reduction in costs whilst maintaining the quality of learning. These improvements can only be achieved through the focused application of technology in teaching, learning and management.Governance and TechnologyICT, Technology, Further Education, Governance
2010This review brings together a range of research evidence and data from England to look at what has been achieved in implementing technology to support learning in the further education (FE) and skills sector.1 Most of the data presented here was collected through studies conducted in early 2009.Harnessing Technology Review 2009. The role of technology in further education and skillsTechnology, Further Education, Personalised Learning, Teaching and Learning, Academic Research, Sustainability
2010When a child moves on from straightforward ABC and times tables, it’s often ‘back to school’ for parents as they try and get their head around complicated topics like long division and modern language verb conjugations. And while it’s important that parents allow children to learn to work independently outside of the classroom, the right level of school delivered effectively, can help reinforce and complement the work that has gone on in the classroom.“I’m stuck can you help me?” A report into parents involvement in school work at homeICT, Technology, VLE, Parents, Teaching and Learning, Primary, Secondary
2010This guidance is to help schools use the learning platform as part of everyday practice. It allows teachers and schools to identify successes, plot progress and plan to transform their school by using the learning platform and other technology. The model is based on Hooper and Reiber’s theories about adopting technology in the classroom.Learning Platforms; Steps to Adoption: step-by-step guide for schoolsICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Leadership, Learning Platforms, VLE, Parents, Personalised Learning, Collaboration, Professional Practice, Showcasing, Communities, Assessment
2010If you need support in getting going on your e-safety agenda, don’t worry – you are not alone! We know from talking to you that many new e-safety leads are daunted by the task. And many others are having to engage with new subgroup members, or change the make-up and profile of their group.Are you on the right track with your eSafety Agenda? Tips for new e-Safety leads and leads with new subgroups. Factsheet 1ICT, Technology, Esafety, LSCB
2010It’s easy to try to second guess what e-safety issues are facing children and young people in our care. But nothing beats asking them directly and finding out what they’re really thinking and feeling. Consulting with local youngsters will give you a clear understanding of the issues you need to address in your action plan. It can also give you insights into how best to tackle the issues (and promote the benefits of technology). This guidance will help you work out the easiest way to consult locally on e-safety issues.Finding out about local e-Safety issues. The smart way to get the information you need. Factsheet 2ICT, Technology, ESafety, Parents, LSCB
2010It’s important that everyone knows about the benefits and opportunities of technology, as well as potential issues. Children, young people and adults all need to be informed about e-safety and actively involved in putting it into practicePlan a community event. How to engage children, young people and adults in one go!. Factsheet 3ICT, Technology, ESafety, Parents, LSCB
2010A ChecklistIs your community group e-safe? PosterICT, Technology, Esafety, LSCB
2010Assessment for learning (AfL) and formative assessment are becoming an increasingly important feature of learning and teaching. Regular assessments help teachers to support individual needs and enable young people and those that support them to monitor their own progress.
Technology has an important role to play in facilitating assessment for learning.
Messages from the evidence: Assessment using technologyICT, Technology, Assessment, Teaching and Learning, Primary, Secondary, Collaboration, Parents
2010Using a range of technologies to engage families.Messages from the evidence: Engaging with families. FactsheetICT, Technology, Parents
2010Creating a positive response to using technology.Messages from the evidence: Narrowing the gaps. FactsheetICT, Technology, VLE, Showcasing
2010How to introduce personal devices for learning.Messages from the evidence: Personal technologies for learning. FactsheetICT, Technology, Mobile, Collaboration, Communities, VLE, Literacy
2010Evidence tells us that using personal technologies can benefit young people in a number of ways. There are new opportunities to provide information, resources and services to learners via their own devices which include ultra-mobile PCs, netbooks and smart phones. However, the management of learning and technology in this context can be challenging. Schools that have used learner devices to good effect have worked hard to put in place suitable policies and provision and have promoted an appropriate culture of behaviour. Unsurprisingly, the teacher’s role is critical.Messages form the evidence: Personal technologies for learningICT, Technology, Mobile, Collaboration, Communities, VLE, Literacy, Teaching and Learning, Professional Practice
2010Online basics is a way to give people the skills and confidence to go online. It covers using a mouse and keyboard, emailing, looking at the internet and keeping safe online. Online basics is an entry-level course.Online basics: The government is working with Becta and UK online centres to help adults learn the basics about computers and the internet. LeafletTechnology, Adults, Further Education
2010Although the country is going through difficult times, we believe that the UK can be the best place in the world for innovation, science and research that our Further Education and Skills system can help to create a climate for economic success and build resilience as we come out of the recession. The effective use of technology will be at the heart of this work.Progress through harnessing technology: A year in the FE and Skills sectorICT, Technology, Further Education, Collaboration, Performance Management, Communities
2010Schools have the opportunity to transform education and help pupils fulfil their potential and raise standards with ICT. But it’s also important that pupils learn how to be safe when they are using these new technologies, particularly Web 2.0 collaborative technologies such as social networking sites, which are becoming an essential aspect of productive and creative social learning. Schools are finding that a blocking and banning approach, which merely limits exposure to risk, may no longer be a sustainable approach. Indeed, Ofsted stated that schools need to “manage the transition from locked down systems to more managed systems to help pupils understand how to manage risk.”Safeguarding children online: Are you managing online risks well?Safeguarding, ICT, Technology, ESafety, Leadership
2010Learning providers have always had a duty of care for their learners at the heart of their policies and practice. Duty of care also includes safe use of technology.Safeguarding in a digital world: An overview for learning providersSafeguarding, ICT, Technology, ESafety, Learning Providers
2009This document summarises the findings of a research study carried out for Becta which examined the experiences across schools, further education colleges, adult learning providers and local authorities of using managed services for ICT provision. The study used survey techniques to identify a range of establishments making use of managed services, and then identified representative candidates for structured interviews. In all, some 29 establishments provided detailed accounts of their experiences, from which the study was able to identify the issues that they encountered, features of good practice and a wide range of benefits that have resulted from outsourcing ICT provision. This is a summary of the findings, illustrated by a wide range of examples from schools and the FE and skills sector.Implementing managed services – benefits and considerations: A summary of findingsICT, Technology, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Local Authorities
2009How are you investing in Next Generation Learning? Investing well in ICT helps schools: • achieve better value through technology that meets established standards for education; • improve learning outcomes through the deployment of effective ICT technologies; • secure affordable and sustainable technology over the long term; • identify the most appropriate and cost-effective level of technical support; • achieve safe and secure access to information and learning resources; • establish more effective ways of handling and communicating information; • develop a robust and flexible route to personalising learning; • develop capabilities to extend learning beyond the classroom.Achieve best value: How are you investing in Next Generation Learning?ICT, Technology, ICT Investment, Safety, Next Generation Learning
2009In 2005, Becta published E-safety: developing whole-school policies to support effective practice, which provided guidance for schools on developing appropriate policies and procedures to ensure safe use of the internet by the children and young people in their care.

In Autumn 2008, Becta invited experts and practitioners working in the field of e-safety to a series of working days with the aim of reviewing and updating the publication. This document is a reflection of current approaches to e-safety, and in particular, the role played by Acceptable Use Policies (AUPs) in maintaining safe behaviours online.
AUPs in context: Establishing safe and responsible online behavioursICT, Technology, ESafety, Acceptable Use Policies, Self-Review Framework, Management, Parents, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, SEN, LSCB
2009An important part of Becta’s role is to create a more exciting, rewarding and successful experience for learners of all ages and abilities, enabling them to achieve their potential. Becta’s strategy, Harnessing Technology: Next Generation Learning, addresses the needs of learners of all ages across the education and skills system.Becta: Our work, its impactICT, Technology, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Parents, Professional Development, Next Generation Learning, LSCB, Teaching and Learning, Self-Review Framework
2009We think that e-portfolios are going to be important for apprenticeships.
In Harnessing Technology: Next Generation Learning 2008–14 (20082), Becta states that, together with its partners, it wishes to ‘produce specific advice and guidance for e-assessment and digital portfolios to include the apprenticeship programmes’ (Becta, 2008:522). Becta shares a vision of learning and training in which personal learning environments bring a range of learning opportunities and resources to a single place. This would mean learners having their own personal online space to support learning and training both at work and at providers.
E-portfolios for apprenticesICT, Technology, Apprenticeships, Personalised Learning, VLE, Training Providers, Business, Assessment
2009We know that parents want regular information about their child’s well-being, progress and achievement. They want to use this to help and support their children from the moment they begin attending school. Schools who are on the journey towards online reporting are already seeing the benefits. Where parents and children are confidently working together in partnership with the school, learner achievement is rising. To help them support their child beyond school, parents welcome the use of technology that keeps them informed on a day-to-day basis about really important matters. This guide provides some examples of the technology now being used by primary schools to inform parents and engage them with their children’s learning. It also contains advice about the approaches primary schools could take to get the most out of information, communication and technology.Exploiting ICT to improve parental engagement, moving towards online reporting: An introduction for Primary SchoolsICT, Technology, Parents, ESafety, Primary
2009Used effectively, learning platforms open up learning opportunities for all pupils in school and extend learning outside the classroom and school. Effective communication and collaboration help make teaching more efficient. Learning platforms also enable school leaders to develop new practices to manage and monitor learning and teaching outcomes.

You may have a learning platform in your school but be unsure about the best ways to introduce it and get the best results. This publication uses information gathered from schools that have already had the experience. It lists a number of ways that schools are getting early benefits from engaging staff, learners and parents.
Getting started with your learning platformICT, Technology, Learning Platforms, VLE, Collaboration, Teaching and Learning
2009To ensure that investment in technology delivers benefits for children, young people and adult learners, the Government has asked Becta to lead the national Harnessing Technology strategy. The aim is to bring about a step change in the way technology is used across education and skills. Harnessing Technology is supported by the Harnessing Technology Grant – Standards Fund investment for schools totalling £639.5 million over three years, 2008 to 2011. This capital grant represents one source of funding for technology. Other sources of technology funding, particularly for recurring costs, are outlined below. Where technology is used well, evidence demonstrates that significant benefits for learners can be achieved. The Harnessing Technology Grant represents an important investment grant to support developments that will benefit all learners. However, delivering better outcomes by using technology to improve services requires determined and co-ordinated approaches at school, local and national levels, and local authorities have an important role to play. On 3 March 2009 Becta published its Harnessing Technology implementation plan for children, schools and families. This outlines specific goals and priorities for the sector and identifies actions that national and intermediary partners will together work to deliver in order to support change.Harnessing Technology funding 2009–10: Guidance for local authoritiesICT, Technology, Funding, Local Authorities, eSafety, Parents
2009Improving your school through technology enables learners to:
• engage in a wider range of learning experiences; • learn at a pace and time to suit their needs; • benefit from improved teaching approaches; • access information and learning; esources safely and securely; • involve their parents and carers in their education; • extend learning beyond the classroom.
Improve your school: How are you enabling Next Generation Learning?ICT, Technology, Next Generation Learning, Teaching and Learning, Leadership, Self-Review Framework, Parents
2009This is the second in the series of publications in which Becta highlights significant issues surrounding the uses of technology for people working in FE and Skills. In the first edition, ten leading voices among learners, providers, leaders, managers and policy advisers gave their views on the Technology strategy for further education: Implementation plan and how developments such as Web 2.0, mobile technology and podcasting were often replacing traditional teaching. It opened up a whole debate about what are the most appropriate teaching methods and styles.

The second edition goes further, addressing key concerns of those who must lead the way to effective management and implementation. One message comes through strongly: only if leaders show an interest will others follow. Change is challenging and people need good reasons to pursue it. They need to see the benefits it brings to learners and how the technology helps them to do what they do best–teach and support learners better.
In conversation with Becta: Harnessing technology in FE and Skills Questions of leadershipICT, Technology, Further Education, Leadership, Professional Development, VLE, Communities, Collaboration, Personalised Learning, ESafety, Inclusion
2009The pivotal role played by college governors in ensuring all learners, staff and managers gain the greatest possible benefits from technology cannot be overstated, as this publication illustrates. In this, the third in the series of In conversation with Becta, LSIS joins the debate as governors are asked to address the key principles and priorities behind measures to improve the effectiveness of leadership and management and the quality of teaching, learning and assessment.In conversation with Becta and LSIS: GovernorsICT, Technology, Governors, Further Education, Teaching and Learning, Collaboration, VLE, SEN, Inclusion
2009The rate of growth and change in the application of technology in learning and skills is so rapid that it is often difficult to stand back and take stock, to reflect on the achievements and lessons learned. This edition of  In Conversation with Becta  takes a snapshot of progress to date and of the benefits that managers, staff, learners, employers and people in the wider community are seeing from the effective use of technology in learning. In this edition, the fourth in the series, nine people with significant responsibility for the practical implementation of technology in the FE and skills sector give their views on the impact the changes are having in their organisations.In conversation with Becta: Making an impactICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Personalised Learning, Further Education, Training Providers, Next Generation Learning, Professional Development, VLE, SEN, Inclusion
2009Personalising learning through technology helps schools:
• give learners the choice to learn at a pace, place and time to suit their needs; • improve the range of teaching opportunities; • extend the choices available to learners; • offer a wide range of engaging learning experiences; • enable learners to tackle a wider range of subjects, in greater depth; • support learners to create their own learning pathway.
Make learning personal: How are you making Next Generation Learning personal?ICT, Technology, Personalised Learning, Learning Platforms, VLE, Teaching and Learning
2009Parents’ needs are changing. This guide introduces you to the ways you can use technology to improve communications with parents. Many schools are experiencing a growing demand from parents for greater reassurance about their child’s well-being, achievement and progress. Parents increasingly expect: • updates on their child’s progress and additional learning needs; • information to help them support their child outside the classroom; • details of their child’s homework.Parents as partners in learning: Discover how technology helps schools, parents and learners work togetherICT, Technology, Parents, Teaching and Learning, ESafety, Collaboration
2009Planning sustainable success enables schools to: • work towards whole-school sustainability; • identify effective technology for their own contexts; • create better learner outcomes through technology infrastructure that’s safe, cost-effective, innovative, reliable, coherent, fit for purpose and fit for planet; • build an effective information management strategy that supports learners, staff, parents and the wider community; • incorporate established educational standards and specifications in technology for learning; • ensure that new buildings and existing learning spaces are fit for purpose.Plan sustainable success: How are you planning for Next Generation Learning?ICT, Technology, Next Generation Learning, Sustainability, Citizenship, Personalised Learning, Parents, VLE, Communities, Collaboration
2009Successful communication about the school day between parent and child actively raises attainment, something which has been proved in countless studies.The “Oh nothing much ” Report: The value of the after school conversationTechnology, Parents, ESafety
2009Becta is the Government’s lead agency for the use of technology to improve education and training in this country. We support the strategic objectives of two government departments – the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills (DIUS) and the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF). We work to make sure that technology is used well to help learners of all ages to learn better, for the benefit of the learners themselves, their families, the economy and society as a whole.Harnessing Technology for Next Generation Learning Becta at work: A progress report 2008ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE, Knowledge Creation, Personalised Learning, Further Education
2009We may confidently predict that the future will be characterised by continuing social and technological change. To prosper and succeed in this changing world will therefore require a lifetime of learning, for all of us. We cannot anticipate in detail the knowledge, skills and understanding that today’s young learners will need throughout their adult lives. The education system which we design today must equip young learners with the flexibility, confidence and abilities that they will need to participate in this lifetime of learning.Becta’s Contribution to the Rose ReviewTechnology, ICT, ESafety, Teaching and Learning, Personalised Learning, Assessment, Collaboration, Professional Practice
2009The FITS framework is a strategic approach designed to help you achieve best practice in ICT support. Use this chart to find out how your ICT support measures up, then you can start the countdown to a full implementation of FITS – effective, sustainable ICT supportThe Countdown to a full implementation of FITSICT, Technology
2009As the Government’s agency for technology in education, Becta is responsible for ensuring that technology is used to provide better learning experiences and outcomes for all learners. We urge schools to make six key contributions towards providing Next Generation Learning.Enabling Next Generation Learning: Enhancing learning through technology. A guide for those who work with schoolsICT, Technology, ESafety, Personalised Learning, Parents, Sustainability
2009Becta has worked with schools who are moving towards online reporting to create a framework which can be used to review progress and identify actions.Exploiting ICT to improve parental engagement moving towards online reportingICT, Technology, Parents
2009This technology strategy is being developed by Becta, in partnership with other national agencies and with colleges and providers in England. Along with our partners – for whose continuing support and commitment we are grateful – we can advise and give support. But it is for colleges and providers themselves to adopt and embed technology, both in their core business of teaching and learning and in their ‘backroom’ systems. They have to see for themselves the quantifiable benefits of technology and the savings that can be achieved, and then take the strategic decision to invest in it.Next Generation Learning: The implementation Plan for 2009-2012ICT, Technology, Further Education, Regeneration, Teaching and Learning, VLE, Workforce Development, Collaboration
2009The FITS Service Desk process follows four key tasks to provide a standard way to manage calls logged for assistanceHow to get started with FITS ICT, Technology, FITS, Technical Support
2009Research shows that children who use technology to support their learning: •are more motivated and engaged; •perform better in national tests; •are more likely to stay in education post-16. This leaflet gives you an inkling of the possibilities effective use of technology brings.Here’s how learning is changing: Discover how technology can transform learningTechnology, ICT, Further Education, Teaching and Learning, ESafety
2009The use of computers and the internet is now an everyday feature of most young people’s lives and those of citizens generally. In this context, there are exciting opportunities to harness technology to improve and develop services in response to the needs of children, young people and parents. This is what Harnessing Technology funding is intended to support.Harnessing Technology: funding 2010-2011: Guidance for local authoritiesTechnology, Funding, Local Authorities, Primary, Secondary
2009Harnessing Technology is a national strategy led by Becta on behalf of the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) and the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills (DIUS). It aims to bring about a step change in the way technology is used across education and skills, to ensure that investment in technology delivers benefits for children, young people and adult learnersHarnessing Technology: funding 2009-2010: Guidance for schoolsTechnology, Funding, Primary, Secondary, ESafety, Parents, Sustainability, Personalised Learning
2009This document advises schools on how to use the Harnessing Technology grant to support improvements in the use of technology in schools. This is considered in the context of other funding to schools, both capital and revenue.Harnessing Technology: funding 2010-2011: Guidance for schoolsTechnology, Funding, Primary, Secondary, ESafety, Collaboration
2009Since December 2008 Becta and the National Union of Students (NUS) have been exploring the role of technology in the learner experience, with a view to increasing learners’ awareness, interest and demand for learning through technology and strengthen learner participation in the FE and Skills sector. This includes a consideration of key issues such as safeguarding. Here we summarise our findings and key recommendations for Becta, NUS, colleges and providers.Harnessing Technology: Embracing Learner VoiceSafeguarding, Technology, Further Education, Learner Voice, VLE
2009This document is aimed at leaders, managers, practitioners and providers working in the Children, Schools and Families sector and their representative bodies. It will also be of interest to national agencies and departmental bodies.Harnessing Technology for Next Generation Learning: Children, Schools and Families Implementation Plan, 2009-2012 Technology, ICT, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Parents, Personalised Learning, Teaching and Learning, ESafety, Governance, Funding
2009This review brings together a range of research evidence and data from England to look at what has been achieved in implementing technology to support learning. Most of the data presented here was collected through studies conducted in early 2009.Harnessing Technology Review 2009. The role of technology in education and skillsTechnology, ICT, Professional Development, Teaching and Learning, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Personalised Learning, VLE, Leadership, Parents, Collaboration, Assessment, ESafety
2009 Technology is part of everyday life: we use it in our work, our leisure time and increasingly as a tool within our learning. Colleges and learning providers have always had a duty of care for their learners at the heart of their policies and practice. Now that duty of care needs to be extended to the safe use of technology. Organisations have a key role in helping learners to develop the skills they need to keep themselves safe, secure and behave appropriately when using technology for learning, leisure and work.Harnessing Technology, Safeguarding Further Education and Skills in a digital worldSafeguarding, Technology, ICT, Further Education, ESafety, Technical Support
2009We are delighted to celebrate the achievements of the winners, runners-up and highly commended schools in Becta’s 2009 ICT Excellence Awards. They represent the inspirational work with technology that exists across the UK and that makes such a huge difference to learners, staff and the whole school community.This is Next Generation Learning: Recognising ICT excellence in schoolsICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Leadership, Primary, Secondary, Collaboration, Personalised Learning, Parents, Inclusion, SEN, Professional Development, Esafety, Self-Review Framework
2009The ICT revolution is a deep cultural revolution changing all modes and patterns of our lives and hence bound to lead to dramatic changes in education. It is characterised by its recognition of two basic facts: a. ICT has a powerful defining impact on all important aspects of our lives and hence our culture (in terms used often in this context: it is a ‘defining technology’) b. The ICT revolution is a part of a group of intertwined revolutions that in the past 20 years have been transforming Western culture from a modern into a postmodern culture. (Aviram & Talmi, 2004, p.4).The impact of digital technology: A review of the evidence of the impact of digital technologies on formal educationICT, Technology, Research, SEN, Inclusion, Primary, Secondary, Teaching and Learning, VLE, ESafety, Mobile
2009Inspire parents to play a more active and positive role. Engaging parents through technology can improve learner achievement by helping parents get closer to their children’s learning. The level of parents’ engagement in a child’s education is a key indicator of a child’s performance in future years. Parental interest is the single most powerful predictor of achievement at age 16.Inspire parental engagement: How are you engaging parents in next generation learning?ICT, Technology, Parents, Leadership, Collaboration, Mobile
2009Our evidence shows a steady growth in e-maturity throughout all parts of the Further Education and Skills sector, but there is still more work to be done to keep this momentum going.
At Becta, we take the national lead in supporting the Further Education and Skills sector to maximise value and transform learning through the effective and creative use of technology
Maximising value measuring impact. Next Generation Learning for Further Education and SkillsICT, Technology, Further Education, Collaboration, Teaching and Learning
2009 Use this framework to review where your school is on the journey towards online reporting.
The accompanying framework guide provides guidance prompts for each aspect of the framework to help you consider the factors involved and decide on the level description that best reflects your current position.
Use this poster, or the table in the guidance, to note your levels and the actions you will take to move towards online reporting.
Exploiting ICT to improve parental engagement moving towards online reporting. Getting started (Poster)ICT, Technology, Parents, ESafety
2009Technology is shaping the jobs of the future and employers want people who can work in teams and are equipped to research, analyse and synthesise information using the latest technologies. At the same time, other people lacking the scope or access are being left behind on the wrong side of the digital divide.Pushing the boundaries of technology: Towards a future vision for the innovative use of technology in FE collegesICT, Technology, Further Education, Teaching and Learning, VLE, Professional Development
2009The Next Generation Learning Charter is a simple way for your child’s school to publicly show its commitment and progress towards best use of technology for teaching and learning. Launched in January 2009 by Becta – the government agency for technology in schools – the Charter process leads and supports schools on a four-stage journey towards excellence. Here’s how...to help put your child’s school on the map Discover the benefi ts of the Next Generation Learning CharterTechnology, Parents, Teaching and Learning
2009Safeguarding learners online is all about schools: • taking action on responsible, safe online use by putting the right whole-school policy in place; • educating everyone in your organisation, including all learners and staff, about how to protect themselves and others online; • monitoring regularly to make sure protection procedures – through technology and the way people use it – are effectiveSafeguard learners online: How are you safeguarding next generation learnersSafeguarding, ICT, Technology, ESafety, Collaboration, Primary, Secondary
2009Schools have a duty of care and must ensure they are able to safeguard children, young people and staff. In most cases, the misuse of ICT is not serious and be dealt with at classroom level. In rare cases children can be in serious danger. Staff are also susceptible to risks, as is the integrity of the whole school communitySafeguarding children online: How esafe are your school and your learners?Safeguarding, ICT, Technology, ESafety, Primary, Secondary
2009“Good parental engagement is fundamental to children’s learning and closely linked to increased attainment. One of the more effective ways for parents to engage in their child’s learning is to maintain good communication with a school, learning more about their child’s progress whilst also helping to identify any development or performance issues early on.”Schools and Parents; A new partnership: Technology supporting a new relationship with schoolsICT, Technology, Parents
2009Children today are increasingly using technology in school and at home. This guide will help you understand the benefits of technology in learning by explaining.Here’s how…. To share the success of Next Generation Learning in schoolICT, Technology, Parents, ESafety
2009As the government’s lead agency on the effective deployment of technology in learning and skills, Becta is only too aware of the fact that not enough small schools are registering for our Self-review framework. We know why this is the case. Some small-school leaders believe that the whole process is too long and that they do not have enough staff to engage with it properly.Self-review framework for small schoolsICT, Technology, Self-Review Framework, Small Schools
2009Technology is increasingly important in education. ICT (information and communications technology) is taught as part of the national curriculum and across different subjects. It also supports other areas of school life, including communications with parents.Supporting your child’s learning: Discover how technology helps parents, schools and pupils work togetherICT, Technology, Parents, ESafety
2009When technology is used well in education, it can open up enormous opportunities for your child. Studies show that children who use technology to support their learning.Here’s how... to talk about technology with your child’s school: Next Generation Learning at school gets better results... pass it on!ICT, Technology, Parents
2008Growing up with Google: what it means to education; Mobile, wireless, connected: information clouds and learning; Location-based and context-aware education: prospects and perils; Emerging trends in serious games and virtual worlds; ‘If it quacks like a duck…’ Developments in search technologies; Interactive displays and next-generation interfaces.Emerging technologies for learning: Growing up with Google: what it means to education Technology, VLE, Visual Learning, Mobile, Games-based Learning, Collaboration, Learning Environments and Spaces, Personalised Learning, Teaching and Learning
2008The Technology Exemplar Network is variously described by participants as a “swap shop” of techniques and solutions, a “mutual e-support service” and a test bed for innovation. It was created to support initiatives among the most advanced and e-mature providers who wish to help others, at earlier stages of progress, to develop their information learning technology. By offering peer support and sharing effective practice with other providers across the country, it was argued that the rest would learn rapidly from the best through a cascade of good research, development and practice.Exemplary Progress: A network to share best practiceICT, Technology, Collaboration, Personalised Learning, Further Education, Training Providers, VLE
2008Ministers have asked Becta to review and refresh the Harnessing Technology Strategy to ensure that it is aligned with the needs of learners of all ages, parents and employers, and that it meets the challenges facing us today and in the future.Harnessing Technology: Next Generation LearningICT, Technology, Next Generation Learning, Leadership, Personalised Learning, Teaching and Learning, Parents, Sustainability, ESafety, SEN, Inclusion, VLE, Collaboration, Communities, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Higher Education, Business, Governance
2008In this booklet we celebrate the winners and runners-up of the 2008 Becta ICT Excellence Awards. There are so many ways in which ICT can transform learning and teaching, so many ways it can help people of all abilities achieve their full potential. Best practice is being shaped across education by dynamic and inspirational teams, in schools and local authorities. It’s fundamental to Becta’s role that we seek out that best practice, and help to spread the word. This booklet offers a snapshot of what’s being done, across the UK and at all levels. This is excellence now, in practice, and in progress. All the schools and organisations here are an inspiration for the future.Next generation learning right now: Recognising ICT excellence in schoolsICT, Technology, Awards, Primary, Secondary, Teaching and Learning, personalised Learning, Parents, Communities, Collaboration, VLE, Visual Learning, Inclusion, SEN, Leadership, Management
2008Personalising learning is critical to the next generation of education. Many of the elements that go into it will be familiar, but it’s important to see how those elements fit together to form a bigger picture. In this guide we’ll focus on clarifying the role of learning platforms in particular and direct you to the resources you’ll need to plan and implement that technology more effectively.Personalising learning in a connected world: A guide for school leadersICT, Technology, Personalised Learning, Leadership, Learning Platforms, VLE, Teaching and Learning, Collaboration, Communities, Esafety
2008The scale and ambition are in themselves impressive: the government is investing more than £50 billion in capital building programmes that will see nearly every secondary school, and half of all primary schools, rebuilt or refurbished within 15 years. But as the first schools built under the programmes open their doors to pupils, an underlying significance is becoming clearer. These schools use innovative design and technology to support fresh ways of teaching and learning. By treating technology as a fundamental building block in school design, the programmes offer a major opportunity to transform education for all learnersPlanning technology into your building: A guide for school leadersICT, Technology, Leadership, Learning Environments and Spaces
2008Right now we estimate that around 28% of school children still do not have internet access at home. That’s a barrier to schools who are pursuing closer engagement with parents (it’s clear that closer engagement improves attainment). It will become an increasing problem for all schools as electronic media becomes more and more the norm for many kinds of communication.Universal access: A guide for school leadersICT, Technology, Leadership, Universal Access, VLE, Teaching and Learning, Parents
2008This is Supplement 3 to Becta’s report to the DCMS: ICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in England . This supplement contains findings on the amenability in those subjects to be resourced and launched by the BBC as part of its digital curriculum service in 2008. Findings on amenability of subjects to be launched by the BBC in 2006/7 can be found in the annex to Becta’s report to the DCMS, and in Supplements 1 and 2 to the report.ICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in England, Supplement 3ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2008This is Supplement 3 to Becta’s report to the DCMS: ICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in Northern Ireland . This supplement contains findings on the amenability in those subjects to be resourced and launched by the BBC as part of its digital curriculum service in 2008. Findings on amenability of subjects to be launched by the BBC in 2006/7 can be found in the annex to Becta’s report to the DCMS, and in Supplements 1 and 2 to the report.ICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in Northern Ireland: Supplement 3ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2008This is Supplement 3 to Becta’s report to the DCMS: ICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in Scotland . This supplement contains findings on the amenability in those subjects to be resourced and launched by the BBC as part of its digital curriculum service in 2008. Findings on amenability of subjects to be launched by the BBC in 2006/7 can be found in the annex to Becta’s report to the DCMS, and in Supplements 1 and 2 to the reportICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in Scotland: Supplement 3ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2008Becta has reached a crucial stage in the development of a tool capable of assessing and improving the use of technology across the entire FE and Skills sector. A common framework for all providers – including colleges, work-based learning organisations and adult and community education centres – is now out for consultation.The state of play E-maturity – a progress reportICT, Technology, Further Education
2008Children who use technology to support their learning achieve more than those who do not.Experience the future of learning todayICT, Technology, Parents, Mobile, ESafety
2008Technology is a strategic asset in education. Maximising its potential and achieving best value from often substantial investments demands careful planning and thoughtful collaboration. This guide will help you understand the many support resources available to help youGetting best value from your investment: A guide for school leadersICT, Technology, Technical Support, Personalised Learning
2008Technology is increasingly used in other sectors to provide personalised services. Learners of all ages use technology for informal learning, recreation and entertainment. This is matched by rising expectations from learners, parents and employers to make good use of technology to support education and training. Achieving a modern world-class education and skills system, embracing schools, colleges and providers in the learning and skills sector, and higher education, is essential to ensuring the UK’s global competitiveness. Technology is a key enabler for that development.Harnessing Technology: Next Generation Learning 2008-2014ICT, Technology, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Higher Education, ESafety, Teaching and Learning, Parents, VLE, SEN, Personalised Learning, Leadership, Professional Development, Sustainability, Governance
2008This booklet is a guide to using the self-review framework, and we hope it will encourage you to adopt the framework principles in planning for the future of your school.How to use the self-review framework: A guide for school leadersICT, Technology, Leadership, Self-Review Framework
2008This think-piece presents the findings from a qualitative study of three colleges that have a reputation for embedding the use of technology in their organisation. The study uncovers the behaviours and practices of the senior and middle leadership teams in these colleges and describes the cultural landscape within each.Harnessing Technology: Realising the benefits. The cultural landscape of successful collegesTechnology, Further Education, Academic Research, Leadership, VLE, Teaching and Learning
2008The use of learning platforms, and their integration with management information systems, has increased during the last year. However, this use is still at an early stage of development in schools and most schools’ infrastructure does not support mobile and remote access to the network. The development and wider adoption of these technologies is a significant factor in achieving further progress, and represents a sound basis for the development of practice with technology more generally.Harnessing Technology Review 2008: progress and impact of technology in education. Full ReportTechnology, ICT, Professional Development, Teaching and Learning, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Personalised Learning, VLE, Leadership, Parents, Collaboration, Assessment, ESafety
2008Three years on from the publication of Harnessing Technology in 2005, the Government asked Becta to revise and further develop this strategy. The refreshed strategy, Harnessing Technology: Next Generation Learning (Becta, 2008), sets out the system-wide role for technology over the next six years.Harnessing Technology Review 2008: progress and impact of technology in education. Summary ReportTechnology, ICT, Professional Development, Teaching and Learning, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Personalised Learning, VLE, Leadership, Parents, Collaboration, Assessment, ESafety
2008The ICT Mark is an accreditation scheme available across the UK which recognises schools achieving a good standard of mature and effective use of technology. Schools holding the ICT Mark have demonstrated that they are committed to using technology to improve their overall effectiveness and efficiency. They are more likely to be regarded as good or outstanding by Ofsted, and are able to demonstrate the impact of their investment in technology.ICT Mark: A guide for school leadersICT, Technology, ICT Mark, Leadership
2008All schools collect and process a great deal of data and, as both the range and the quantity of data increases, there is a growing need to manage information effectively. The Information Management Strategy framework has been designed in collaboration with schools, local authorities and suppliers to help schools assess their position and develop their own strategy for information management.Information Management Strategy Framework: A brief guide for local authoritiesICT, Technology, Information Management, Research
2008Both the range and the quantity of information held in schools is ever increasing, and alongside its growth is the need to manage this information effectively. Becta’s Information Management Strategy framework is a tool designed to help schools assess their current position and develop their own strategy for managing information. This guide is an introduction for school leaders on how to make best use of the framework in their own school.Information Management Strategy Framework: Guidance for SchoolsICT, Technology, Information Management
2008This first edition of In Conversation includes a range of opinions and comment on new technologies, such as Web 2.0, mobile technology and the way developments, such as podcasting, are replacing the traditional lecture. These developments open up a whole debate about what the most appropriate teaching methods and styles will be in the future as systems become more participatory and accessible to all learners.In conversation with Becta: Join the debate – leading voices from FE and Skills give their views to stimulate discussion around progress in learning technologyICT, Technology, Further Education, Teaching and Learning, Mobile, Professional Practice, Work-based Learning
2008Technology plays a central role in the effective leadership and efficient management of colleges.
It is a key resource that helps governors to support learning and teaching and other services offered by their college.
Making technology work for F E Colleges: Advice for governorsICT, Technology, Further Education, Leadership, Governance, Teaching and Learning, Collaboration
2008Becta announced in January 2006 that it would conduct a review of Microsoft’s Vista and Office 2007 products. In announcing the review, we indicated that we would look carefully at what advice we would give in relation to the advantages of coherence and continuity in ICT institutional infrastructure, as opposed to, for example, investing resources in constantly acquiring the most recent versions of products.Microsoft Vista and Office 2007. Final report with recommendations on adoption, deployment and interoperabilityICT, Technology
2008Since 1998, in conjunction with the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) (and its previous incarnations), Becta has been providing advice and guidance to schools and local authorities (LAs) on all aspects of e-safety.Safeguarding children in a digital world: Developing an LSCB e-safety strategySafeguarding, ICT, Technology, ESafety, Local Authorities, LSCB
2008In the physical world it’s relatively straightforward to work out what the duty of care towards the young people in your charge might mean, and the precautions you have to take. The virtual world is more demanding, if only because the range of activities any of us can do online is expanding and changing. This is a good thing in itself, opening new opportunities for learning and creativity, but it also means thinking ahead of new risks. In this guide we’ll set out the basic elements of good practice to keep our learners safe.Safeguarding children online: A guide for school leadersSafeguarding, ICT, Technology, ESafety, Leadership, Parents, LSCB
2008The self-review frameworkThe self-review framework: An overview of the eight elementsICT, Technology, Self-Review Framework, Leadership, Assessment, Professional Development
2008Information and communication technology has the potential to transform education for the better. It’s our job in Becta, the government agency for technology in education, to inspire schools and colleges to realise that potential. We’ll do that by working to make sure the right technology is available, by setting standards to guide everyone in the sector, and through tools that help establish and promote best practice.Supporting technology in schools: A guide for local authoritiesICT, Technology, Local Authorities, ESafety, Personalised Learning, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Parents
2008The Technology Exemplar Network will create a national peer support network that will help all those involved to further develop the use of technology for learners to improve the quality of provision and the learner experience. Each exemplar provider has identified a key aspect of their delivery which is exemplary and will be the focus area for their work with other providers within the Technology Exemplar Network. Technology Exemplar Network: Exemplar Status Providers (April 2008)ICT, Technology, Further Education, Higher Education, Training Providers, Collaboration
2008Manage the ICT in your school in line with established best practice and you can expect better learning outcomes and more effective use of valuable resources. Becta’s self-review framework helps you assess how you’re doing and plan for improvement. In this guide, you’ll find out more about how self-review works and how, when linked with the prestigious ICT Mark, it can bring you wider recognition for your achievements.Using technology for school improvement: A guide for school leadersICT, Technology, Leadership, Self-Review Framework, Learning and Teaching, Assessment, Professional Development
2008In just a few years schools have made fantastic progress in securing good technology to support all aspects of school development. But this success means that priorities must shift to a new set of questions. All schools need to be asking themselves how the tools now in place can be used most effectively. Many schools are already doing this. Is your school on the way to being next generation learning ready?What is the self-review framework?: A guide for school leadersICT, Technology, Leadership, Self-Review Framework, Management
2007In the past, many schools have purchased ICT products and services in a piecemeal fashion, dependent on funding to serve their immediate needs. This has not provided a consistent level of service or the best value for money. The cost of ICT must now be met out of the core budget of schools, so it is essential to have a range of best value procurement arrangements in place. Schools and local authorities are required to make all of their purchases in accordance with public procurement regulations and best value principles. Becta’s procurement frameworks follow and promote best practice and comply with current procurement legislation. They also provide an auditable assurance of value for money, with suppliers being continuously monitored for performance and value throughout the life of the framework.Making the most of your investment in ICT: Improving learning through technologyICT, Technology, Leadership, VLE, Communities, Collaboration, Learning Platforms, Personalised Learning
2007Becta announced in January 2006 that it intended to conduct a review of Microsoft’s academic licensing programmes, focusing on the range, scope and cost of the licensing programmes available, and the extent to which these not only met the needs of schools and colleges, but also represented value for money. The review examined the total costs of exiting subscription licence agreements and the corresponding risks of ‘lock-in’.Microsoft’s academic licensing programmes: Interim report with recommendations for improving value for moneyICT, Technology, Licensing, Costs
2007Becta announced in January 2006 that it intended to conduct a review of Microsoft’s Vista operating system and Office 2007 productivity suite. The review comprised a detailed analysis of the new functionality in Vista and Office 2007, and an evaluation of the usefulness of that functionality when set against a number of key criteria for deployment. Extensive interoperability tests were also carried out between different versions of Microsoft’s products and between Microsoft products and competitor offerings. We summarise below the main findings in respect of: • Vista; • Office 2007; • Competitor office productivity suites and interoperability issues.Microsoft Vista and Office 2007: Interim report with recommendations on adoption and deploymentICT, Technology, Interoperability, Evaluation, Costs
2007These quality principles relate to the design and use of digital learning resources to support effective learning and teaching. This publication is intended as a guide rather than a ‘checklist’ for quality, and it is expected that few digital learning resources will in themselves encompass all of the quality principles. Whether you are designing a resource or choosing one, the intended educational purpose of the resource will determine which principles are most important to you.

The principles are divided into two groups, which are interrelated: • Core pedagogic principles, which underpin effective learning and teaching,drawing from learning theory and commonly accepted best practice; • Core design principles, covering issues such as resource design, accessibility and interoperability.
Quality principles for digital learning resourcesICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Inclusion, SEN, Assessment, VLE, Collaboration, Communities, Interoperability
2007This report covers the following areas: 1. The role of ICT in the lives of children today; 2. E-safety and whole-school issues; 3. Learning benefits of ICT; 4. Risks associated with using ICT; 5. Using the technologies safely; (• Using the internet; • Using email; • Using chat and instant messaging; • Using social software; • Using fi le-sharing services; • Using mobile phones and the mobile internet; • On the horizon); 6. E-safety resources; 7. Reporting abuse and seeking further help and advice; 8. Embedding e-safety issues into the curriculum at Key Stages 3 and 4; 9 Embedding e-safety messages into the ICT Key Stage 3 National Strategy; 10 Opportunities for working with parents, carers and the wider community; 11 Opportunities for collaboration and sharing good practiceSignposts to safety: Teaching e-safety at Key Stages 3 and 4ICT, Technology, ESafety, VLE, Collaboration, Teaching and Learning, Parents, Mobile, Citizenship
2007In 2006, Becta commissioned research into the functionality, benefits, issues impact, on learning and teaching and total cost of ownership involved in implementing Thin Client technology in schools. This included a literature review, a questionnaire to schools using the technology and detailed case studies of 12 schools. This document summarises the findings from that research. A Becta survey of network infrastructure and ICT equipment in schools, conducted in late 2005, found that 5.2 per cent of primary schools and 9.2 per cent of secondary schools were using a Thin Client network.Thin Client technology in schools: A summary of research findingsICT, Thin Client Technology, Primary, Secondary, Teaching and Learning, Costs, Learning Environments and Spaces
2007This is supplement no.2 to Becta’s report to the DCMS: ICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in England . This supplement contains findings on the amenability in those subjects to be resourced and launched by the BBC as part of its digital curriculum service in 2007. Findings on amenability of subjects to be launched by the BBC in 2006 can be found in the annex to Becta’s report to the DCMS, and in supplement no.1 of the reportICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in England, Supplement 2ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2007This is supplement no.2 to Becta’s report to the DCMS: ICT, amenability and theBBC digital curriculum service in Northern Ireland . This supplement containsfindings on amenability in those subjects to be resourced and launched by theBBC as part of its digital curriculum service in 2007. Findings on amenability ofsubjects to be launched by the BBC in 2006 can be found in the annex to Becta’sreport to the DCMS, and in supplement no.1 of the report.ICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in Northern Ireland: Supplement 2ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2007This is supplement no.2 to Becta’s report to the DCMS: ICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in Scotland . This supplement contains findings on amenability in those subjects to be resourced and launched by the BBC as part of its digital curriculum service in 2007. Findings on amenability of subjects to be launched by the BBC in 2006 can be found in the annex to Becta’s report to the DCMS, and in supplement no.1 of the report.ICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in Scotland: Supplement 2ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2007This is Supplement 3 to Becta’s report to the DCMS: ICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in Wales. This supplement contains findings on the amenability in those subjects to be resourced and launched by the BBC as part of its digital curriculum service in 2008. Findings on amenability of subjects to be launched by the BBC in 2006/7 can be found in the annex to Becta’s report to the DCMS, and in Supplements 1 and 2 to the report.ICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service In Wales: Supplement 3ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2007By using the latest ICT equipment in our schools, we can be sure that technology will hold no fears for the workers of tomorrow. This has to be good news for UK plcBecta Annual Review 2007ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE, Knowledge Creation
2007ICT-supported learning is a key motivator for the majority of 14-19 year olds. The opportunity to collaborate with their peers, to create their own material and to personalise and reflect upon their learning, leads them to engage more effectively. This engagement is a key element in improving retention and achievement for this age group.How technology supports 14-19 reform: An essential guideICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Personalised Learning
2007Building Schools for the Future (BSF) is the biggest single government investment in improving school buildings for over 50 years. The aim is to rebuild or renew every secondary school in England over a 10-15 year period, bringing together major investment in buildings and in ICT.ICT and Building Schools for the Future: An essential guideICT, Technology, Leadership
2007Inclusive learning is a process of increasing the presence, participation and achievement of all learners. If the provision is right, everyone will be included – and ICT can help you achieve this.Inclusive Learning: An essential guideICT, Technology, Inclusive Learning, Teaching and Learning, SEN
2007Personalising learning is at the heart of achievement for all learners. Traditionally, enabling learners to learn in ways appropriate to their needs has been difficult for education providers to achieve. By harnessing and exploiting new technologies, we can create teaching and learning opportunities that will make it possible for these aspirations to become a reality.Learning Platforms and Personalised Learning: An essential guideTechnology, ICT, Personalised Learning, Learning Platforms, ESafety
2007The internet is opening new opportunities for everyone, promoting creativity and effective learning. To use technology effectively requires an understanding of its value in the classroom, and an awareness of both the benefits and risks it poses for children’s learning.Using Technology safely in schools: An essential guideTechnology, ICT, ESafety
2007Becta is running these events to engage all of your expertise and experience in shaping the next phase of the national technology strategy for education. We want this revised strategy to fully exploit the power of technology to provide a 21st century education that reaches and benefits all learners and enables the UK to compete globally. The aim is to make this a strategy which underpins and helps deliver a more demand-led and personalised education system.Harnessing Technology Learning in the 21st Century: Call to actionICT, Technology, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Higher Education
2007This publication builds on the Becta Reviews of 2005 and 2006, focusing discussion closely on the ambitions of the government’s e-strategy, Harnessing Technology.Harnessing Technology Review 2007: progress and impact of technology in education. Full ReportTechnology, ICT, Professional Development, Teaching and Learning, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Personalised Learning, VLE, Leadership, Parents, Collaboration, Assessment, ESafety
2007This publication builds on the Becta Reviews of 2005 and 2006, focusing discussion closely on the ambitions of the government’s e-strategy, Harnessing Technology.Harnessing Technology Review 2007: progress and impact of technology in education. Summary ReportTechnology, ICT, Professional Development, Teaching and Learning, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Personalised Learning, VLE, Leadership, Parents, Collaboration, Assessment, ESafety
2007 In this issue: • improving schools through ICT; • LSCBs and e-safety – the issues considered; • every child matters: strategic leadership; • personalising learning; • DQIs for building design and ICT; • harnessing technology – a new level of partnership; • strategic technologies springICT Update: Spring 2007ICT, Technology, ESafety, Personalised Learning, Self-Review Framework, Inclusion
2007The impact of ICT in schools report was commissioned by Becta on behalf of the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) to analyse the impact of ICT on the schools sector across the United Kingdom. Over 350 published literature sources were consulted, ranging from policy documents, professional journals, research reports, reviews and digests to commercial publications. This summary sets out key messages from the literature, focusing firstly on the infrastructure, secondly on the impact on learning and teaching and, thirdly, on the extent to which ICT supports communication and links. It concludes by drawing out several issues for further exploration and research.The impact of ICT in Schools – a landscape reviewICT, Technology, Research, Leadership, Teaching and Learning, Professional Practice, Research, VLE, Personalised Learning, Attainment, STEM, Collaboration, PDA, Tablet, Mobile, Primary, Secondary, Games-based Learning, Visual Learning, SEN, Inclusion
2007There has never been a more important time to consider the role of technology in promoting and supporting learning. Modernising schools and colleges and developing skills for tomorrow’s workforce are important policy priorities. Technology has a critical role in delivering these agendas.
This report summarises Becta’s case for technology. It presents the powerful, evidence-based arguments for investment in technology across education and training.
Learning in the 21st Century: The case for harnessing technologyICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Personalised Learning, VLE, Knowledge Economy, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Employability, SEN, Inclusion
2007This guide is designed to help schools to understand how legislation applies to their learners and what ‘reasonable adjustment’ may mean in the context of supporting learning with, and through, ICT. The guide applies to the software and learning materials used on individual or networked computers. It applies to tools used to access learning, learning resources, and tools used by learners and practitioners to create resources.Making software accessible: A guide for schoolsICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Accessibility, Inclusion
2007The ICT Excellence Awards reward those schools across the UK which are approaching ICT in outstanding and innovative ways, benefiting their whole community, inside and outside the school building. By recognising whole-school best practice these awards are closely aligned with Becta's self-review framework for school and college improvement with ICT. While rewarding the school as a whole, there is also a focus on those individuals leading change within the school and making an impact across it.Rewarding ICT Excellence in Schools: ICT Excellence AwardsICT, Technology, Self-Review Framework
2007This publication highlights for local authorities (LAs) and the newly formed local safeguarding children boards (LSCBs) the key questions that they urgently need to consider in safeguarding children and young people in their care from e-safety risks. This checklist has been designed to give core members of LAs and LSCBs a quick snapshot of the e-safety issues and risks, and to signpost activities that they must develop across all the services within their remit.Safeguarding children online: A checklist for Local Authorities and Local Safeguarding Children BoardsSafeguarding, ICT, Technology, ESafety, Local Authorities, LSCB
2007This booklet does not intend to cover the specifics of e-safety issues or technologies. You will find those in previous Becta e-safety publications, many of which we have referenced here. Where we use the terms ‘e-safety’ or ‘online’, we refer to all fixed and mobile technologies that children and young people may encounter, now and in the future, which allow them access to content and communications that could raise issues or pose risks to their wellbeing and safety. Safeguarding children online: A guide for Local Authorities and Local Safeguarding Children BoardsSafeguarding, ICT, Technology, ESafety, Local Authorities, LSCB
2007Children and young people have embraced new technologies as a source of information, education and entertainment. A recent report, Their space: education for a digital generation ,1 from the think tank Demos found that ‘the use of digital technology has been completely normalised by this generation, and it is now fully integrated into their daily lives’Signposts to safety: Teaching e-safety and key stages 1 and 2ICT, Technology, ESafety, Primary, Research, SEN, Professional Practice, Teaching and Learning, Parents
2007Using the self-review framework helps the school to address learning and teaching with ICT within the renewed framework.The Self-review Framework supporting the primary national strategy: Guidance for school leadersICT, Technology, Self-Review Framework, Leadership, Learning and Teaching, Professional Development
2007Although 25% of colleges are now classed as e-enabled – integrating technology into teaching, learning and management – pressures of policy change and expansion of student numbers make it hard to stay ahead. To achieve and sustain progress in embedding technology, colleges must have a forward-thinking and regularly updated strategy that enables the organisation to be agile in responding to change. Technology for a change: Evidence and practiceICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Management, Further Education
2006All pupils expect to be able to use a computer as a communication tool – to access information, to record their ideas and to support their creativity. Having a visual impairment need not be a barrier, as there is a range of support from simple accessibility tools to specialist software and hardware that can enable learners to access the curriculum and communicate. This leaflet lists sources of information on how ICT can help, and how to use specific items of software and hardware.

2006
Using ICT to support visual impairmentICT, Technology, Visual Impairment Software, Visual Impairment Hardware
2006Increasingly, research evidence demonstrates the role that technology has to play in delivering benefits for colleges and for students. Here Becta presents the research evidence that every college leader needs to know.Making a difference with technology for learning: evidence for college leadersICT, Technology, Leadership, VLE, Personalised Learning, Communities, Collaboration, Assessment
2006This summary sheet summarises the report Managing ICT costs in schools (Becta 2006), which is based on the findings from a series of projects with 43 schools between 2002 and 2005. The report explores how, in a changing context, school leaders can get the best value from existing technology and staff skills, while identifying sustainable arrangements for the future. Publication of the e-strategy (DfES 2005) marked a step change in government thinking about the importance of educational technology, and ICT is now regarded as a basic educational utility rather than as an additional service. Becta’s National Digital Infrastructure underlines this point and clarifies that the systems and services required to embed ICT in schools must be appropriate, reliable, affordable and sustainable.Managing ICT costs in schools: Summary sheetICT, Technology, Costs, VLE, Self-Review Framework, Sustainability
2006This report summarises work undertaken with 43 schools between 2002 and 2005 in a series of projects which focused on the total cost of ownership (TCO) of ICT. The data gathered using the Becta Total Cost of Ownership model are shown in tables and charts. The projects highlighted how knowledge of the full costs of ICT can support management investment decisions. The key messages in this report will enable headteachers, ICT decision-makers, local authority officers and governors to develop a strategy for sustainable ICT provision appropriate to their schools. The summary sheet which accompanies this report also contains all the key messages and may be useful for wider distribution.Managing ICT costs in schoolsICT, Technology, Costs, VLE, Self-Review Framework, Sustainability
2006An electronic whiteboard is an excellent presentational device. It can be used as an alternative to virtually every other classroom resource, traditional and modern, for example blackboards, flip charts, OHPs, maps, pictures, number lines, ‘big books’, calculators, and cassette and video players. At a touch, the teacher has access to a bank of resources that would previously have taken years to accumulate and a vast cupboard to store. The electronic whiteboard has the potential to do much more – to go beyond display, providing a tool for interactive teaching and learning. Of course, not all learning is interactive.Teaching Interactively with Electronic Whiteboards in the Primary PhaseICT, Technology, Primary, Teaching and Learning, Visual Learning, Professional Practice, Collaboration, Foundation, Primary
2006One of the key findings of this project is that consultancy can be effective in delivering institutional transformation, and adds significant value to those organisations which engage appropriately and effectively with consultants. Based on this evaluation, it is recommended that institutions seeking to make e-learning transformation actively consider working with consultants at key stages to help achieve progress. To support this Becta has developed:
• a consultancy model to promote the improved definition, integration and implementation of e-learning in the post-16 sector. This model combines public-sector tools, advice and guidance supported by private-sector consultancy skills and experience.
• recommendations on the best ways to engage with consultants, ensuring delivery of successful projects and getting the best value for money.
This publication presents the main findings of this project, outlines the consultancy model and sets out guidelines on how to identify, procure and work with ICT consultants to deliver quantum change in e-learning.
Guidance on using consultants: Transforming learning and teaching through ICTICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Consultants, Further Education
2006This booklet aims to help developers to create pedagogically sound, high-quality digital resources that are useful to teachers and that help learners to make good progress. The BETT Awards recognise and reward high-quality ICT products that practitioners can use with confidence, so our starting point has been the products that won BETT Awards in 2005 and 2006Advice For Industry On Developing Quality Digital Content For SchoolsTechnology, ICT, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2006This is supplement no.2 to Becta’s report to the DCMS: ICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in Wales. This supplement contains findings on amenability in those subjects to be resourced and launched by the BBC as part of its digital curriculum service in 2007. Findings on the amenability of subjects to be launched by the BBC in 2006 can be found in the annex to Becta’s report to the DCMS, and in supplement no.1 of the report.ICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service In Wales: Supplement 2ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2006The 2006 Becta Review offers us an opportunity to examine trends in technology adoption and use and assess the progress and impact of technology in education, drawing on evidence from a range of recent surveys and research studiesThe Becta Review 2006: Evidence on the progress of ICT in educationICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Further Education, VLE
2006Many learners have a physical, sensory or cognitive impairment that means that they need assistive technology to access the curriculum. This can include switch access to replace keyboard and mouse, onscreen grids, voice recognition so they can control a computer entirely by speech, or a whole host of specialised devices. This leaflet lists sources of information on how ICT can help learners to access a computer, and how to use specific items of software and hardware.ICT Support Access TechnologyICT, Technology, VLE, Computing
2006All learners need to be able to record their thoughts and to have the opportunity to write creatively. Many struggle to write by hand however and ICT can offer a range of alternatives to support them.ICT Support: Using ICT to support recording difficultiesICT, Technology, VLE, Computing
2006The ability to inspire and motivate learners and colleagues is a common attribute of this year’s ICT in Practice Awards winners. The Awards process continues to identify models of excellence and highlight exemplary practice in teaching and leadership.Celebrating ICT in PracticeICT, Technology, Computing, Leadership, Teaching and Learning, Professional Development, Further Education
2006Why use ICT? Because it works. ICT (Information and Communications Technology) has been shown to improve learning and teaching in the classroom. Here we look at the benefits and the evidence...Curriculum Online: PrimaryICT, Primary, VLE, Teaching and Learning, Collaboration
2006Why use ICT? Because it works. ICT (Information and Communications Technology) has been shown to improve learning and teaching in the classroom. Here we look at the benefits and the evidence...Curriculum Online: SecondaryICT, Secondary, VLE, Teaching and Learning, Collaboration, Professional Practice
2006This report presents the findings of the third survey of schools carried out as part of the evaluation of Curriculum Online. The survey was conducted in maintained primary and secondary schools in England during the 2005 autumn term. One questionnaire collected school-level information for each school and additional questionnaires collected data for selected subject areas. This report includes findings related to: awareness of Curriculum Online; use of the website; the impact of eLearning Credits (eLCs) on spending and purchasing processes; changes in the use of ICT in teaching and attitudes towards the role of ICT; and changes in the levels of ICT resources in schoolsEvaluation of curriculum: Online report of the third survey of schoolsICT, Technology, Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, Quantitative research
2006This information sheet summarises an evaluation of the Framework for ICT Technical Support (FITS) in 16 secondary schools. The aim of the evaluation was to understand how FITS is being adopted in schools and its positive impact upon ICT support and user satisfactionEvaluation of the framework for ICT technical support (FITS)ICT, Technology, FITS, Technical Support, Secondary
2006This pocket guide is designed as a handy reference book for everyone involved in ICT management or day-to-day technical support in schools. Anyone defining ICT or technical support strategy in schools will also find it helpful. The guide is complementary to the Framework for ICT Technical Support Operations Management (FITS OM), developed by Becta.FITS OM Pocket GuideICT, Technology, FITS
2006This guide provides an overview of the support and guidance available to primary school teachers through Becta, and acts as a signpost to other sources of information and advice to help you explore new ways of using ICT in your work.School Improvement with ICT: A guide for primary school teachersICT, Technology, Primary, Professional Development, ESafety, Technical Support, Inclusion, SEN, Teaching and Learning
2006This guide provides an overview of the support and guidance available to primary school teachers through Becta, and acts as a signpost to other sources of information and advice to help you explore new ways of using ICT in your work.School Improvement with ICT: A guide for secondary school teachersICT, Technology, Primary, Professional Development, ESafety, Technical Support, Inclusion, SEN, Teaching and Learning
2006This plan is for the Government, Becta and partner agencies to show how the e-strategy will be delivered. It sets out how Becta will co-ordinate and lead the delivery of the Government’s e-strategy for education and children’s services.Harnessing Technology Delivery PlanICT, Technology, Leadership, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Higher Education, Governance
2006‘Delivering the future for learners: harnessing technology’ on 7 November 2006 brought together leaders from all sectors of education.Delivering the future for learners: harnessing technology. A report of the harnessing technology eventICT, Technology, Leadership, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Higher Education, Governance, Collaboration, Personalised Learning
2006Currently, too few schools, colleges and training providers take all the actions needed to reap the benefits of ICT consistently, and so there is now a strong moral argument that all providers should gain the clear benefits for learners and improve the effectiveness and overall efficiency of the education system. The e-strategy aims to help all involved in education to work together to make this happen in all institutions and wherever learning takes place.Delivering the future for learners: harnessing technology – the role for leadersICT, Technology, Leadership
2006This study is the seventh in a series that assesses progress in the provision of ICT within further education (FE) and sixth-form colleges since 1999. It also forms part of the evidence base that will inform the development of post-16 e-learning by examining the integration of this provision with the teaching and learning process.ICT and e-Learning in Further Education; management, learning and improvementICT, Technology, Further Education, Teaching and Learning, VLE, Research, Professional Practice
2006This is the seventh in a series that has assessed progress in the provision of ICT within further education (FE) and sixth-form colleges since 1999. The survey was carried out in February and March 2006 and a total of 122 colleges took part, representing 31 per cent of the sector.The ICT and e-Learning in FE Survey 2006ICT, Technology, Further Education, Survey, Sustainability
2006In this issue: • launching the Self-Review Framework; • national digital infrastructure; • safeguarding children; • government’s e-strategy; • Becta news: Becta appoints new Directors
ICT Update: Spring 2006Safeguarding, ICT, Technology, Self-Review Framework, VLE, Teaching and Learning, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, ESafety
2006The ICT Excellence Awards were launched by Becta in January 2006 with the specific purpose of supporting the development of the self-review framework. The self-review framework is an online resource which helps all schools to evaluate where they are in developing and managing their use of ICT to maximise organisational performance. It consists of eight elements which have been identified by Becta and nationally agreed with partners as key to achieving organisational effectiveness through ICT.ICT Excellence Awards: Transforming Schools through ICTICT, Technology, Assessment, Teaching and Learning, Leadership, Inclusion, Primary, Secondary
2006Broadband connectivity is a central component of Becta’s vision for a coherent, dependable and sustainable ICT architecture for education, connecting schools to a wide range of content, services, applications and institutions. In this way, broadband connectivity will support teaching and learning and facilitate easy access to, and exchange of, management and administrative data.The impact of Broadband in Schools: Summary reportICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE, Professional Development
2006Increasingly, research evidence demonstrates the role that technology has to play in delivering benefits for local authorities, schools and for learners. Here Becta presents the research evidence that local authority decision-makers and advisers need to know. Making a difference with technology for learning: evidence for local authoritiesICT, Technology, Local Authorities, Research, Data Management, Professional Practice, Personalised Learning
2006Increasingly, research evidence demonstrates the role that technology has to play in delivering benefits for schools and learners. Here Becta presents the research evidence that every school leader needs to know. Making a difference with technology for learning: evidence for school leadersICT, Technology, Leadership, Improved Attendance, Personalised Learning, Learning Platforms, Teaching and Learning
2006Learning to use a computer really helps to improve confidence and allows you to get more involved in your child’s education. It also means you will know how to store photographs and music electronically, save money by paying your bills online, shop online and keep in touch with family and friendsMany prospects…..one future: Learning computer skills together as a family (Leaflet)Technology, Parents, ESafety
2006This publication is intended to provide a strategic overview of e-safety issues to policy makers, and outlines a model for a co-ordinated approach by all of the key stakeholders. The guidance in this publication refers to policies and documentation related to England. However the principles discussed have resonance across the UK and beyond.Safeguarding children in a digital world: Developing a strategic approach to eSafetySafeguarding, ICT, Technology, ESafety, Leadership, Research
2006The next five years will see the effective use of information and communications technology (ICT) systematically embedded across the education sector in policy and in practice – a move that is set to position the UK as world leader in the use of new technologies in schools and colleges.Improvement through ICT: An essential guideICT, Technology, Self-Review Framework, Learning and Teaching, Professional Development, Personalised Learning, Parents
2006Many schools recognise the potential offered by ICT to transform the experience and outcomes for the learner. They also recognise that getting the most from ICT creates real challenges for busy schools. The fundamental questions are ‘how well are we doing?’ And ‘how can we do better?’School Improvement through ICT: Working in partnership -The self-review frameworkICT, Technology, Self-Review Framework, Partnerships
2006As part of Becta’s ongoing work of advising Government and developing technical standards, we investigated how schools compare to current standards such as the institutional infrastructure technical specification. The objectives of the survey were to help policymakers and to inform the strategy for engaging schools in adopting the standards.Survey of LAN infrastructure and ICT equipment in schoolsICT, Technology, Research, LAN
2006The ICT Excellence Awards were launched by Becta in January 2006 with the specific purpose of supporting the development of the self-review framework. The self-review framework is an online resource which helps all schools to evaluate where they are in developing and managing their use of ICT to maximise organisational performance. It consists of eight elements which have been identified by Becta and nationally agreed with partners as key to achieving organisational effectiveness through ICT.Transforming Schools through ICT: Excellence Awards 2006ICT, Technology, Primary, Secondary, Self-Review Framework, Leadership, Management, Teaching and Learning, Professional Development, Assessment, SEN, Inclusion
2006Using the self-review framework, schools can identify where their use of ICT is most effective and plan the practical steps they can take to move forward. Using the self-review framework in a special school: Guidance for leadersICT, Technology, SEN, Inclusion, Leadership, Teaching and Learning, Collaboration, Self-Review Framework
2005This is one of a series of occasional publications for those who provide support to schools, colleges and education organisations. The series aims to equip LEAs and other intermediaries with current information and resources, so that they may support schools and other education providers in working towards sustainable, embedded use of ICT.Extending the boundaries of learningICT, Technology, Parents, Nursery, Primary, SEN, Visual Learning, Inclusion, Communities, Collaboration, Mobile, VLE
2005This booklet is one in a series of publications called ‘Include ICT’ that examine the ways in which schools and other organisations are developing inclusive learning and teaching practices using ICT. It looks at the progress which has been made since 1999 in the effective use of ICT for adults with severe learning disabilities, and identifies some successful practices. In particular, reference is made to the work of the Karten CTEC Centre in Oxfordshire, which provides ICT skills training for people with learning disabilities, and for staff and carers.Coming of age: Effective use of ICT for adults with severe learning disabilitiesICT, Technology, Adults, SEN
2005This booklet is one in a series of publications called ‘Include ICT’ that examine the ways in which schools and other organisations are developing inclusive learning and teaching practices. It looks at ways in which ICT can support special schools in sharing their expertise and extend their own practice through dialogue and interaction with colleagues across mainstream schools. The schools in this case study were chosen because they undertake some activities that can be implemented relatively easily, but which can move the agenda for special schools within an inclusive system forward significantly.Communities of schools: Special schools working with mainstream – using ICT to support inclusionICT, Technology, SEN, Inclusion, Collaboration
2005Pupils with a wide range of special educational needs (SEN) are increasingly being educated in their local neighbourhood mainstream school.The aim is to create greater social integration, better community development and raised standards for all pupils. This booklet is one in a series of publications called ‘Include ICT’ that examine the ways in which schools and other organisations are developing inclusive learning and teaching practices. It looks at ways in which teachers in mainstream schools can encourage full participation in aspects of school life by all the pupils in the school.Something for everyone: ICT and an inclusive mainstream classroomICT, Technology, SEN, Teaching and Learning, Inclusion, VLE, Professional Practice, Personalised Learning
2005Recent legislation places duties on educational institutions with respect to the provision offered to learners with special educational needs and/or disabilities. In broad terms, all schools and colleges must make ‘reasonable adjustments’ to ensure that these learners are not put at a substantial disadvantage in using any facilities or resources – and that includes the use of ICT.
This guide aims to help providers understand the legal requirements covering use of software by learners with disabilities, and to help developers and commissioners of educational software and electronic resources to create accessible, usable, adjustable and inclusive materials. It includes a list of functional requirements that are intended to help providers work in an accountable and robust way towards achieving standardisation in the accessibility of software and learning materials.
Making Accessible SoftwareICT, Technology, Business, SEN, Inclusion
2005This review has recommendations for addressing the sub-optimal features of the current arrangements: Strategic Context – Why MIS Systems Matter; Key Messages from MIS Suppliers; The LEA Perspective; The Implications of the ‘Do Nothing’ Option; Approach to Commercial ,Technical and Support Issues; Reviewing the Statutory Returns Process.
School Management Information Systems and Value for MoneyICT, Technology, MIS, Leadership, Management
2005This report examines eight case studies of schools included in Becta’s Open Source Software in Schools project, funded by the DfES. It identifies the ways open source software (OSS) has been incorporated, used and managed in school ICT infrastructures. It also presents the perceptions of schools’ senior management teams (SMTs), teaching staff and pupils about the impact and use of OSS. The schools in the case studies were selected to represent the broad range of schools covered in the project. Four primary and four secondary school case studies were compiled from interviews with staff and pupils. These were examined to identify trends that may highlight how OSS is being used.Open Source Software in Schools: A case study reportICT, Technology, Management, Open Source Software, Teaching and Learning, VLE, Parents, Primary, Secondary
2005This report records work that Becta has done with schools which have implemented a range of open source software (OSS) solutions. This project, funded by the DfES, was one of an interrelated series, all looking at ways of helping schools make effective and sustainable use of ICT by exploring the total cost of ownership (TCO) of their ICT infrastructure.Open Source Software in Schools: A study of the spectrum of use and related ICT infrastructure costsICT, Technology, Management, Open Source Software, Costs, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2005This report provides an analysis of twelve case studies involving schools in England that were using Tablet PCs. The analysis is complemented by brief individual reports describing aspects of how each of these schools was using Tablet PCs. The key findings emerging from the case studies were that Tablet PCs: • for maximum benefit, needed to be used in conjunction with a wireless network; • needed to be introduced in a planned way that took full account of the school’s vision, as well as of the technical infrastructure, support and staff development, and day-to-day management issues; • increased the amount of ICT use and the degree of integration of ICT across the curriculum; • at some schools were used effectively to replace an ICT suite and thus free up space; • increased motivation, and hence were likely to have a positive impact on learning outcomes; • supported moves to more independent and collaborative study; • used with a wireless data projector, provided a better solution than a desktop or laptop and hardwired interactive whiteboard; • were seen as being more versatile than laptops, although the higher price of Tablet PCs relative to similarly specified laptops was prohibitive.Tablet PCs in schools: Case study reportICT, Technology, Mobile, VLE, Teaching and Learning, Personalised Learning, Collaboration, Learning Environments and Spaces, Visual Learning, ESafety, SEN, Inclusion, Primary, Secondary
2005National Curriculum for England: amenability findings for subjects and key stages in the BBC’s Year 1 commissioning plansICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in England, Supplement 1ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2005The DCMS asked Becta to take on responsibilities in relation to the BBC’s proposed digital curriculum service. In particular Becta is tasked with adjudicating in the question of amenability as set out in condition 7 of the DCMS conditions for the approval of the digital curriculum service:ICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in Northern IrelandICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2005Northern Ireland Curriculum: amenability findings for subjects and key stages in the BBC’s Year 1 commissioning plansICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in Northern Ireland: Supplement 1ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2005The BBC first put forward the concept of a ‘digital curriculum service’ in 2000. A period of discussion and debate with interested parties followed. The BBC sought approval for its final version from the Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) on 3 May 2002.The proposals were given detailed consideration, which included assessment of the potential market impact and also took into account various market features, such as the ongoing provision of electronic learning credits (eLCs) to schools in England via Curriculum Online. Following public consultation, the Rt Hon Tessa Jowell MP, Secretary of State for Culture,Media and Sport, gave consent to the BBC digital curriculum service, subject to limits and constraints, on 9 January 2003.The European Commission gave clearance in September 2003.ICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in ScotlandICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
20055–14 National Guidelines for Scotland: amenability for subjects and age ranges for the BBC’s Year 1 commissioning plansICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in Scotland: Supplement 1ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2005The BBC first put forward the concept of a ‘digital curriculum service’ in 2000. A period of discussion and debate with interested parties followed.The BBC sought approval for its final version from the Department of Culture,Media and Sport (DCMS) on 3 May 2002.The proposals were given detailed consideration, which included assessment of the potential market impact and also took into account various market features, such as the ongoing provision of electronic learning credits (eLCs) to schools via Curriculum Online. Following public consultation, the RT Hon Tessa Jowell MP, Secretary of State for Culture,Media and Sport, gave consent to the BBC digital curriculum service, subject to limits and constraints, on 9 January 2003.The European Commission gave clearance in September 2003.ICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service In WalesICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2005National Curriculum for Wales: amenability findings for subjects and key stages in the BBC’s Year 1 commissioning plansICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service In Wales: Supplement 1ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2005This review draws on a range of recent evidence to set out the progress that has been made in schools and the learning and skills sectors and to understand current challenges in realising the full potential of ICT in education in a new policy era .The Becta Review 2005: Evidence on the progress of ICT in educationICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Further Education
2005This is the second report by the Content Advisory Board (CAB) to the Secretary of State on the performance of Curriculum Online. The first report, submitted in May 2004, reviewed our work programme and set out a number of recommendations in relation to: eLearning Credits (eLCs), research on quality, commissioning plans, and interventions to support the embedding of ICT in the classroom.Content Advisory Board (CAB) Report to the Secretary of State Report No 2ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2005This is the third report by the Content Advisory Board (CAB) to the Secretary of State. It reviews the current state of the digital content market, with particular reference to Curriculum Online, and provides observations and recommendations on the BBC digital curriculum service and other work carried out in 2005 on behalf of CABContent Advisory Board (CAB) Report to the Secretary of State Report No 3ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2005The effective use of information and communications technology (ICT) offers schools a unique opportunity to transform learning and teaching – to the benefit of learners, teachers, managers and institutions, as well as the UK economy as a whole.Delivering the National Digital Infrastructure Enabling Improvement through ICTICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning
2005This leaflet provides a brief introduction to some of the main areas of digital content development and the help and support that the website offers.Advice and Guidance for E-Learning Content ProvidersTechnology, ICT, VLE
2005The internet and other digital and information technologies are powerful tools, which open up new opportunities for everyone. Electronic communication helps teachers and students learn from each other. These technologies can stimulate discussion, promote creativity and stimulate awareness of context to promote effective learning. Students with internet access are more confident and have been shown to produce better-researched, more effective and well presented projects.E-Safety: Developing whole school policies to support effective practiceICT, Technology, ESafety
2005This guide for school governors focuses on ICT infrastructure – the hardware, cabling, networks, connectivity and software that enable a school to use ICT to support learning, teaching and administrationICT: essential guides for school governors (ICT Infrastructure)ICT, Technology, Procurement, ESafety
2005This guide is intended to enable school governors to: • contribute to developing and reviewing a vision for learning and teaching with ICT • consider how their schools could develop the use of ICT to enhance learning and teaching • monitor the use of ICT in the curriculum more effectivelyICT: essential guides for school governors (Learning and teaching)ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Assessment, Inclusion, Communities
2005This guide is intended to enable school governors to: • contribute to developing or reviewing a vision and policy for continuing professional development (CPD) for ICT • monitor the extent to which effective ICT professional development for all staff is taking place.ICT: essential guides for school governors (Professional Development and ICT)ICT, Technology, Professional Development, Inclusion
2005This guide is intended to enable school governors to: • understand the importance of whole-school improvement planning in enabling organisational change • contribute to whole-school improvement through an awareness of the part ICT can play as a vehicle of change • monitor the role of ICT in contributing to more effective communication both within and beyond the schoolICT: essential guides for school governors (ICT and whole-school improvement)ICT, Technology, Inclusion, School Improvement
2005The Schools ICT Unit at Bolton LEA provides support, advice and guidance to the secondary schools in the Bolton metropolitan area on a whole range of issues. As part of this support, every year each school gets three consultancy days – of which one focuses on managing ICT.FITS Case Study Improving delivery of ICT technical support, BoltonICT, Technology, FITS, Technical Support
2005Thornleigh is a secondary voluntary-aided comprehensive school with sports college status. Having about 1,670 pupils aged 11 to 18 plus 113 teaching staff and 69 associate staff, it is a large school. Yet the school’s network manager, Kevin McAleer, does not have the air of someone struggling to keep his head above water coping with the myriad problems that can arise in a complex school network. Part of the reason lies in Kevin’s belief that buying good quality equipment – preferably all from the same manufacturer – gives fewer headaches and more value for money in the long run.FITS Case Study Improving delivery of ICT technical support, ThornleighICT, Technology, FITS, Technical Support, Secondary
2005Turton is a school used to delivering good results – as evidenced by its highly favourable Ofsted report and a string of awards and accolades. The school, with specialist status in media and the performing arts, has 106 staff and 1,700 pupils studying a wide range of subjects at all levels. Over the last few years the school has invested extensively in ICT, which it sees as imperative to future curriculum delivery and maintaining its status as a specialist college.FITS Case Study Improving delivery of ICT technical support, TurtonICT, Technology, FITS, Technical Support, Secondary, Incident Management, Problem Management, Secondary
2005This study is the sixth in a series that assesses progress in the provision of ICT within further education (FE) and sixth form colleges since 1999. It also forms part of the evidence base that will inform the development of the post-16 e-learning programme by examining the integration of this provision into the teaching and learning process.ICT and e-Learning in Further Education: The challenge of changeICT, Technology, Further Education, Teaching and Learning, VLE, Research, Professional Practice
2005What can a sedentary discipline like ICT possibly contribute to a subject centred around action and bodily performance? Why bother to use technology at all? How do teachers answer these questions? This report is drawn from three national qualitative studies, carried out over five years and involving over 200 skilled computer users in the UK teaching force.1 The studies explored good practice in the use of ICT in 12 separate curriculum subjects.
Body and Mind: A report on the use of ICT in physical education (PE)ICT, Technology, PE, Research, Visual Learning, Teaching and Learning, Inclusion, SEN
2005This booklet is one in a series of publications called ‘Include ICT’ that examine the ways in which schools are developing inclusive learning and teaching practices. This booklet looks at social inclusion and attempts to identify some successful strategies from two first schools in Worcestershire. The schools featured are not new schools, nor do they have enormous budgets for lots of leading-edge equipment. Many of the children do not have access to ICT outside the school premises. These schools have been chosen because they are doing interesting things with modest equipment, and the activities they have developed could be replicated in any school.
A good start: Using ICT to enable social inclusion in primary schoolsICT, Technology, Primary, Inclusion, SEN, Teaching and Learning, Literacy, Visual Learning, Parents
2005This booklet is one in a series of publications called ‘Include ICT’ that examine the ways in which schools and other organisations are developing inclusive learning and teaching practices. It focuses particularly on the Inclusion website, which was designed to identify content and information relating to the needs of pupils with SEN within the UK educational system, and on other websites that can support teachers in meeting the needs of all pupils within an inclusive education system.Offering Support: The inclusion website and other sources of helpICT, Technology, Primary, Inclusion, SEN, Teaching and Learning, Literacy
2005This booklet is one in a series of publications called ‘Include ICT’ that examine the ways in which schools and other organisations are developing inclusive learning and teaching practices. It explores ways in which ICT can be used in all schools to develop recording systems that are integral to planning, teaching and assessment.On the record: ICT as a management toolICT, Technology, Management, Inclusion, SEN, Primary, Secondary, Assessment, Collaboration
2005This booklet is one in a series of publications called ‘Include ICT’ that examine the ways in which schools and other organisations are developing inclusive learning and teaching practices. It explores ways in which ICT may be used to support deaf or hard-of-hearing pupils within a mainstream class. While the main focus is on including pupils with hearing difficulties, there are issues that will be familiar across the range of SEN and disabilities, and uses of ICT that may address challenges faced by many children.See and hear: Using ICT to support the inclusion of deaf pupils in mainstream schoolsICT, Technology, Inclusion, SEN, VLE, Teaching and Learning, Visual Learning
2005This information sheet identifies the key findings of Becta’s recent work exploring how a small sample of schools implemented open source software solutions. The sheet also identifies any benefits and issues that LEAs and schools need to be aware of when considering open source software.Using Open Source Software in SchoolsICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Parents
2005This review highlights key findings from a literature search and review of projects using Tablet PCs in English schools (for details, see Methodology, p12). Many of the findings for Tablet PCs apply equally to other mobile devices such as laptopsTablet PCs in schools: A review of literature and selected projectsICT, Technology, Research, Mobile
2005This document, written in response to the final report of the working group on 14–19 reform1, anticipates the Government’s white paper on 14–19 curriculum and qualifications reform .Using technology and e-learning to support the 14-19 agendaICT, Technology, 14-19 Agenda, Personalised Learning, Secondary, Further Education, Higher Education, Leadership, Assessment, Collaboration, VLE
2005These case studies were produced as part of the research commissioned by the British Educational Communications and Technology Agency (Becta), and funded by the Learning and Skills Council (LSC), into the use of ICT and e-learning for work-based learning in the skills sector.ICT and e-learning for work-based learning in the skills sector: Five case studiesICT, Technology, VLE, Work-based Learning
2005This research – commissioned by Becta and funded by the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) – focuses on publicly funded small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and the public sector. It describes developments and identifies how to best use the opportunities offered by new technologies to improve the effectiveness of learning in the workplace.What you need to know about the use of ICT and e-learning for work-based learning in the skills sector: An overview of the researchICT, Technology, Research, Work-based Learning, VLE, Training Providers
2005There is no shortage of web-based materials that can contribute to the teaching of business studies and economics: the main difficulty lies in identifying those that will meet the needs of particular students and courses. Some websites that hold useful resources make significant demands on literacy skills, so it is particularly important for teachers to select resources that are both relevant and accessible to their students.Using web-based resources in Business and EconomicsICT, Technology, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2005Becta is a UK agency and we support all four UK education departments in their strategic ICT developments. Becta’s mission is to exploit the power of ICT to support learning. We provide strategic leadership on ICT and learning, helping to develop a world-class education system. Becta guides and co-ordinates the necessary changes in policy and practice and brokers effective partnerships to establish and exploit reliable and sustainable educational technology.Working in partnership with the ICT industryICT, Technology, Collaboration, Leadership, Sustainability
2004There are many ways in which technology can support understanding between people from different cultural and linguistic communities and celebrate our common humanity. This booklet draws on examples of the successful use of new media to support cultural diversity, some of which were celebrated at UK Netd@ys 2003. These examples come from Europe and beyond, and show the benefits of international and cross-cultural links, and how these links can be made easier by technology. The young people involved enjoyed an enriched curriculum, which gave them opportunities for creativity and fun – we hope to share this enjoyment with you.Celebrating Cultural Diversity: Discover, understand, appreciate through ICTICT, Technology, International, VLE, Teaching and Learning
2004LEAs have an important role to play in supporting schools as their pupils transfer from one phase of education to another.Transferring between phases often causes pupils to stagnate – or even regress – in terms of educational achievement, and many schools and LEAs are adopting strategies to tackle this. ICT has a role to play here, not only in providing an administrative tool but also, as a transferable skill, in providing pupils with a means for collaborative working, personal development and continuity of learning.Moving on: The role of ICT in pupils’ transitionICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Personalised Learning, VLE, Communities, Collaboration, Transition
2004This report is based on an analysis of current research about the use of Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) in teaching and learning. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading. There is some confusion about the definition, functions and role of VLEs used in the research literature. There are two terms currently being used when referring to ICT environments designed to aid the management of the learning process: VLEs (Virtual Learning Environments) and MLEs (Managed Learning Environments). They are generally a combination of some or all of the following features: ● Communication tools such as email, bulletin boards and chat rooms' ● Collaboration tools such as online forums, intranets, electronic diaries and calendars; ● Tools to create online content and courses; ● Online assessment and marking; ● Integration with school management information systems; ● Controlled access to curriculum resources; ● Student access to content and communications beyond the school.

What the research says about Virtual Learning Environments in teaching and learningICT, Technology, VLE, Collaboration, Teaching and Learning, Professional Practice, Parents
2004This report is based on an analysis of current research about the use of ICT to reduce teachers’ workloads .The Teacher Workload Study conducted by Pricewaterhouse Coopers (PwC,2001) estimated that ICT could save between 3.25 hours and 4.55 hours per teacher per week.The issue of reducing workload is,however, much wider than whether ICT can help.Technology may be able to save time in the delivery of certain tasks but whether the task is necessary in the first place also needs careful consideration. The report summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.
The administrative tasks covered here include: ● preparing lesson plans and worksheets; ● writing student reports and Individual Education Plans; ● collating and analysing student attainment information for target-setting ● recording and analysing attendance and disciplinary information.
This report considers a wide range of ICT, including: ● portable ICT devices; ● school networks; ● web-based resources; ● video conferencing; ● common office applications such as spreadsheets, word processing and databases.

What the research says about ICT and reducing teachers’ workloICT, Technology, Professional Practice, VLE, Communities, Collaboration, Teaching and Learning, Parents
2004This is the first in a series of Content Advisory Board (CAB) reports to the Secretary of State on the performance of Curriculum Online (COL). The report has been produced taking account of the objectives provided to CAB as part of its terms of reference and the specific requests set out in the Secretary of State’s letter to the Chair of the CAB (dated 23 March 2004). Our next full report will be provided in December 2004, with a progress update in October 2004Content Advisory Board (CAB) Report to the Secretary of State Report No 1ICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2004Recent legislation on data protection and freedom of information has given greater rights to the individual and alongside them, greater responsibilities on those who hold personal data, whether on paper or electronically. This document provides a brief overview of the implications these changes involve for schools.Data Protection and Security – A summary for schoolsESafety, ICT, Technology, Mobile
2004This guide focuses on administrative roles and responsibilities and aims to help governors to: • be aware of the vital role that ICT plays in supporting effective leadership and efficient management and administration • gain a better understanding of the administrative processes within schools • appreciate how the use of ICT in administration can help the school release teacher time • implement the National Agreement on school reform.ICT: essential guides for school governors (Admin roles and responsibilities)ICT, Administration, ESafety
2004This guide aims to provide governors with information about ICT and assessment so they can: • identify the key areas for their involvement in assessment; • act as ‘critical friends’ to the headteacher. The publication summarises types of assessment and governors’ statutory duties in this area and provides information on how ICT can help with assessment. It does not address the assessment of ICT as a subjectICT: essential guides for school governors (Assessment and ICT)ICT, Technology, Assessment
2004ICT is increasingly becoming part of our daily lives, in the way that radio and television did fifty years ago. This is amply illustrated by the use of mobile communications, games consoles, digital cameras and other technologies in the home, school and workplace. The 2002 Household Survey revealed that almost 90 per cent of young adults now use the internet from time to time. It also found that over 50 per cent of households now own a PC and that over a quarter of households have direct access to the internetICT: essential guides for school governors (Developing a vision for ICT )ICT, Technology, Inclusion
2004E-confidence has been identified as a major focus for the ongoing use and development of ICT in schools in 2004–2005.The Government’s vision for ICT, Fulfilling the Potential, states that ‘We want every school leader and governor, every teacher and member of support staff and every pupil to become e-confident’.ICT: essential guides for school governors (Towards the e-confident school)ICT, Technology, VLE, Teaching and Learning, Assessment, Inclusion
2004The DfES has commissioned Becta to produce a series of documents for school governors. This guide focuses on current policy directions that form part of the Government’s e-learning vision and has three sections: • The Policy Framework – the main directions from Government that affect ICT • Support and Review – support arrangements that are in place for schools • Resources for ICT – an overview of available resourcesICT: essential guides for school governors (Policies and Directions)ICT, Technology, Policy, Inclusion
2004This is one of a series of documents for school governors produced by Becta.This guide outlines the need for governors to monitor the use of ICT – and pupils’ use of the internet in particular – so that while pupils use ICT whenever and wherever it is appropriate, they do so in safety. It also highlights the main health and safety issues associated with using ICT equipment.ICT: essential guides for school governors (Safety and Security with ICT)ICT, Technology, ESafety, Health and Safety
2004The purpose of the evaluation is to assess the effectiveness of the ICT Test Bed project in terms of its five key foci. It incorporates external and internal strands which are inter-related to maximise formative impact on the projectEvaluation of the DfES ICT Test Bed ProjectICT, Technology, Primary, Secondary, Further Education, Action Research, Teaching and Learning, Leadership, Collaboration, Professional Development
2004This report sets out the findings of a study investigating the use of information and communication technology (ICT) and its impact following significant investment in the ICT infrastructure and provision at the Millennium Primary School (MPS), Greenwich. The investment in ICT was a result of a DfES-funded infrastructure project and one aim of this study was to investigate its effectiveness and outcomesAn exploration of the use of ICT at the Millennium Primary School, GreenwichICT, Technology, Primary, Teaching and Learning, Research, Parents, Sustainability
2004This pocket guide is designed as a handy reference book for anyone involved in ICT management or day-to-day technical support in schools. It can also be used by anyone defining ICT or technical support strategy in schools. The guide is complementary to the Framework for ICT Technical Support (FITS), developed by Becta.FITS Pocket GuideICT, Technology, FITS
2004Interactive whiteboards are creating quite a stir in classrooms across the country. Pupils talk about enjoying lessons more and finding them more interesting. Teachers revel in the increased range of materials available and celebrate the tangible improvements in pupils’ behaviourGetting the most from your interactive whiteboard: A guide for primary schoolsICT, Technology, Primary, Teaching and Learning, Classroom Management
2004The content of this booklet is specifically aimed at senior managers and teachers in secondary schools, and includes practical classroom examples and case studies. Getting the most from your interactive whiteboard: A guide for secondary schoolsICT, Technology, Secondary, Teaching and Learning, Classroom Management
2004Becta has entered into negotiations with Microsoft and arrived at a pricing model that takes account of the total spend on Microsoft software by all UK schools. The outcome of these negotiations is a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between Becta and Microsoft. This MoU applies to schools in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.Guidance to schools purchasing Microsoft productsICT, Technology, Software
2004ICT has a unique position within schools today in the drive to raise standards and support learning. After staffing, the provision and sustainability of ICT equipment and services has become the most expensive item on most schools’ annual budget. In 2004 the only ring-fenced funding for schools, whether primary or secondary, relates to the provision of ICT equipment and services.Information and Communications Technology (ICT): An essential guide for school governorsICT, Technology, Leadership, Teaching and Learning, Professional Development, ESafety, Inclusion
2004This research reports on the evaluation of the application of a distributed learning environment, served by a repository of rich learning-object-based content that can be adapted and integrated into local teaching and learning strategies. This key skills field trial has led to a broader discussion around an exciting area of technological and educational development as it has been applied in practice to a somewhat problematic curriculum area.Using ICT to share the tools of the teaching trade: A report on Open Source teachingICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Research, VLE, Professional Practice, Personalised Learning, Communities, Secondary, Further Education, Leadership, Assessment
2004There are many uses of ICT that are appropriate with design and technology (D&T), and there is an increasing number of web-based resources that can support and enhance learning in this area.Using web-based resources in Primary Design and TechnologyICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004Many useful resources to support modern foreign languages (MFL) can be accessed using the internet. These can then be bookmarked and set to be used offline. The teacher can download and adapt some resources to meet the learning and teaching of specific objectives. The examples given here describe a number of lessons in which ICT is used effectively to support the teaching and learning of modern foreign languages with children in Key Stage 2.Using web-based resources in Primary Modern Foreign Languages ICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004Many useful resources to support the art and design lesson can be accessed using the internet. These can then be bookmarked and set to be used offline. The teacher can download and adapt some resources to support the teaching and learning of specific key objectives. The examples given here describe a number of lessons in which ICT is used effectively to support the teaching and learning of art and design with children in Key Stages 1 and 2.Using web-based resources in Primary Art and DesignICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004The internet has many useful resources to support secondary English. You can bookmark these resources and the students can use them online, or download them and adapt them to meet the teaching and learning of specific objectives.Using web-based resources in Secondary EnglishICT, Technology, Secondary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004Many good geographical resources can be accessed using the internet. These can be bookmarked, or added to a list of favourite sites, and set to be used offline. Some resources can be downloaded and adapted by the teacher to meet specific learning objectives. The examples given here describe a number of lessons in which ICT is used effectively to support the teaching of geography at Key Stages 3 and 4.There are also resources for the post-16 phase.Using web-based resources in Secondary GeographyICT, Technology, Secondary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004Using web-based resources is one of a number of ways to contribute to pupils’ entitlement to ICT in music lessons at Key Stage 3.Using ICT in music is statutory at this key stage and it should be used to ‘recall, capture, change, combine, create, manipulate and refine sounds’. Some examples given here describe lessons in which web-based materials were used to aid Key Stage 3 pupils in developing their musical skills, knowledge and understanding. Other examples relate to non-statutory GCSE work in Key Stage 4.Using web-based resources in Secondary MusicICT, Technology, Secondary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004There are many uses of ICT that are appropriate with design and technology (D&T), and there is an increasing number of web-based resources that can support and enhance learning in this area.Using web-based resources in Primary Design and TechnologyICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004Many good foundation stage resources can be accessed using the internet. The examples given here describe a number of activities in which ICT is used effectively to support the early learning goals.Using web-based resources in the Foundation StageICT, Technology, Foundation, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004Many useful resources to support the art and design lesson can be accessed using the internet. These can then be bookmarked and set to be used offline. The teacher can download and adapt some resources to support the teaching and learning of specific key objectives. The examples given here describe a number of lessons in which ICT is used effectively to support the teaching and learning of art and design with children in Key Stages 1 and 2.Using web-based resources in Primary Art and DesignICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004Many useful resources to support modern foreign languages (MFL) can be accessed using the internet. These can then be bookmarked and set to be used offline. The teacher can download and adapt some resources to meet the learning and teaching of specific objectives. The examples given here describe a number of lessons in which ICT is used effectively to support the teaching and learning of modern foreign languages with children in Key Stage 2.Using web-based resources in Primary Modern Foreign LanguagesICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004This series of booklets outline the online resources that can be used to support teaching in a range of subject areas.Using web-based resources in Primary SeriesICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004There are many uses of ICT that are appropriate within design and technology, among them an increasing number of web-based resources that can support and enhance learning in this area.Using web-based resources in Secondary Design & TechnologyICT, Technology, Secondary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004Many good resources to support the teaching and learning of English as an additional language (EAL) can be accessed using the internet. These can be bookmarked and set to be used offline. Some can be downloaded and adapted by the teacher to meet specific learning objectives. The examples given here describe a number of lessons in which ICT is used effectively to support the learning and teaching of EAL students in Key Stages 3 and 4.They are simply that – examples of how a particular type of web based resource can be used. The approaches can be adapted for all subjects by all teachers to support the English language development of bilingual students.Using web-based resources in Secondary EALICT, Technology, Secondary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004The internet has many useful resources to support secondary English. You can bookmark these resources and the students can use them online, or download them and adapt them to meet the teaching and learning of specific objectives.Using web-based resources in Secondary EnglishICT, Technology, Secondary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004Many good geographical resources can be accessed using the internet. These can be bookmarked, or added to a list of favourite sites, and set to be used offline. Some resources can be downloaded and adapted by the teacher to meet specific learning objectives. The examples given here describe a number of lessons in which ICT is used effectively to support the teaching of geography at Key Stages 3 and 4.There are also resources for the post-16 phase.Using web-based resources in Secondary GeographyICT, Technology, Secondary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004Many good resources for mathematics can be accessed using the internet. Some of these resources can be downloaded and adapted by the teacher to meet specific learning objectives while others can be used ‘as is’. The examples in this booklet describe a number of lessons in which ICT is used effectively to support the learning and teaching of mathematics at Key Stages 3 and 4.Using web-based resources in Secondary Mathematics (PDF opens on back page)ICT, Technology, Secondary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004Using web-based resources is one of a number of ways to contribute to pupils’ entitlement to ICT in music lessons at Key Stage 3.Using ICT in music is statutory at this key stage and it should be used to ‘recall, capture, change, combine, create, manipulate and refine sounds’. Some examples given here describe lessons in which web-based materials were used to aid Key Stage 3 pupils in developing their musical skills, knowledge and understanding. Other examples relate to non-statutory GCSE work in Key Stage 4.Using web-based resources in Secondary MusicICT, Technology, Secondary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004The internet has many useful resources to support secondary religious education. You can bookmark these resources for use offline, or download them to print out or adapt to meet the teaching and learning of specific objectives. The examples given here describe a number of lessons in which ICT is used effectively to support the teaching and learning of RE in Key Stages 3 and 4. Each of the examples shows just one of many ways in which these web-based resources can be used: you will have your own ideas which will be just as relevant as those given here. Some of the resources need plug-ins or additional software, such as Flash or Real Player, before you can access them fully.Using web-based resources in Secondary REICT, Technology, Secondary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004The Web-Based Resources series offers information on useful internet resources and applications that can be used to support learning and teaching across the curriculum. They also include helpful examples of each resource being used in classroom teaching. An example activity from each subject is in this booklet.Using web-based resources in Secondary SeriesICT, Technology, Secondary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2004This report is based on an analysis of current research about the use of ICT to reduce teachers’ workloads. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading. What the research says about ICT and reducing teachers’ workloadsICT, Technology, Research, Workloads
2004This report is based on an analysis of current research about the use of ICT to support teachers’ continuing professional development and education. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about ICT and continuing professional development (CPD) for teachersICT, Technology, Research, Professional Development
2004This report is based on an analysis of available research about the use of portable information and communications technology (ICT) devices in teaching and learning. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about portable ICT devices in teaching and learningICT, Technology, Research, Mobile, Teaching and Learning
2004This report is based on an analysis of current research about the use of Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) in teaching and learning. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about Virtual Learning Environments in teaching and learningICT, Technology, Research, VLE, Teaching and Learning
2004This report is based on an analysis of current research concerning ICT and classroom organisation in primary and secondary schools. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about ICT and classroom organisation in schoolsICT, Technology, Research, Learning Environments and Spaces, Primary, Secondary, Teaching and Learning, SEN, Mobile
2004This report is based on an analysis of available research about the use of ICT in the teaching and learning of history. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about using ICT in HistoryICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Visual Learning, VLE
2004This report is based on an analysis of current research about the use of ICT in the teaching and learning of geography. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about using ICT in Geography ICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Mobile, Primary, Secondary, VLE
2004This report is based on an analysis of available research about how primary and secondary teachers are using ICT in the teaching of modern foreign languages. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about using ICT in modern foreign languagesICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, VLE, Visual Learning, Personalised Learning
2004This report based on an analysis of current research about ICT and classroom organisation in primary and secondary schools. It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about ICT and classroom organisation in schoolsICT, Technology, Research, Learning Environments and Spaces, Primary, Secondary, SEN, Teaching and Learning, Professional Development
2004This report based on an analysis of available research about the use of ICT to support teachers‘ continuing professional development and education. It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about ICT and continuing professional development (CPD) for teachersICT, Technology, Research, Professional Development, Teaching and Learning
2004This report based on an analysis of current research about the use of ICT in the learning and teaching of geography. It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about ICT in GeographyICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Visual Learning, VLE
2004This report based on an analysis of available research about the use of ICT in the learning and teaching of history. It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about using ICT in HistoryICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2004This report based on an analysis of available research about how primary and secondary teachers are using ICT in the teaching of Modern Foreign Languages. It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about using ICT in modern foreign languagesICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Primary, Secondary, VLE, Personalised Learning
2004This report based on an analysis of available research about the use of portable information and communications technology (ICT) devices in teaching and learning. It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about portable ICT devices in teaching and learningICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Mobile, Personalised Learning
2003This report is part of a series of publications aimed at exploring the relationship between schools’ use of ICT and pupils’ achievement in national tests and examinations. It builds on earlier publications and complements reports published in the DfES/Becta research and evaluation series. It examines  the relationship between the use of ICT and educational standards based on data obtained on schools from Ofsted inspections for the academic year 2000–01. This is further supplemented by test and examinations data from QCA for the same period.Primary Schools – ICT and Standards: An analysis of national data from Ofsted and QCA by BectaICT, Technology, Leadership, Teaching and Learning, STEM, Inclusion, VLE, Parents, Attainment
2003Over the past few years Becta has established a growing body of evidence on the impact of ICT on standards in our schools.This report – part of a series – is based on a detailed analysis of the results of Ofsted inspections and QCA data on schools’ performance in national tests. As with previous reports in the series, it supports the case that ICT can help to improve teaching and learning in our schools. This report focuses in particular on the quality of the opportunities to learn with ICT provided to pupils, and whether there is any link to improved standards. The evidence from this study suggests that ICT should be regarded as central to the effort to improve standards, and that those schools which have been able to provide good opportunities to learn with ICT have benefited in terms of pupil attainment, motivation and attendance.Secondary Schools – ICT and Standards: An analysis of national data from Ofsted and QCA by BectaICT, technology, Secondary, Leadership, STEM, Teaching and Learning, VLE, Collaboration, Parents, Professional Practice, Inclusion
2003The role of the teacher is paramount in raising standards in science.When ICT is used as a demonstration tool it allows teachers to: • show scientific concepts and models; • explain and ask questions; • stimulate discussion; • invite interpretations of what is displayed; • encourage individuals to give a response, explanation or make a prediction.Using web-based resources in Secondary ScienceICT, Technology, Secondary, Teaching and Learning, Visual Learning, VLE
2003The internet has greatly increased the sources available for history teaching in secondary schools.Web-based resources can be used online or offline or, where copyright permits, as print-outs for class or homework.The examples given here cover a range of possible activities in which ICT is used effectively in different ways. The National Curriculum for England gives examples of types of applications that can be used to enhance pupils’ learning and interest in the subject which do not involve the purchase of large amounts of subject-specific software. Instead they encourage teachers to use generic software such as word processors and data-handling programs when relevant to lesson objectives.

Using internet-based resources need not be a stand-alone activity. Pupils need to see the internet as only one of a range of sources of information, and should be encouraged to compare and combine findings from books, pictures and other media as well as internet sites. Internet searches can be used in combination with other software such as word processors to help pupils to construct historical arguments in which the web resources are used to illustrate a point. Some pupils will benefit from the use of word-processing techniques to help them to analyse texts such as primary sources found on the web, before drawing conclusions about their point of view, their accuracy or the extent to which they are related to other sources.
Using web-based resources in Secondary History
ICT, Technology, Secondary, Teaching and Learning, Visual Learning, VLE
2003This report is based on an analysis of current research about the use of interactive whiteboards in teaching and learning. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading. Among the potential applications covered in this report are: ● using web-based resources in whole-class teaching; ● showing video clips to help explain concepts; ● demonstrating a piece of software; ● presenting students’ work to the rest of the class; ● creating digital flipcharts; ● manipulating text and practising handwriting; ● saving notes written on the board for future use; ● quick and seamless revision.What the research says about interactive whiteboardsICT, Technology, Visual Learning, Teaching and Learning, Collaboration, Professional Practice
2003This report is based on an analysis of available research about ICT and whole-school improvement. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading. The term ‘whole-school improvement’ is used in this briefing to describe the wide range of ways in which schools can progress and develop in order to raise standards, and the role that ICT can play in this process. When considering the impact of ICT in education there often tends to be a focus on whether, and to what extent, ICT can raise pupil achievement; although this is an important aspect and a measure of a school’s performance, there are many other factors which can reflect the extent to which a school is improving. The purpose of this briefing is to identify the ways in which ICT can assist with all of these factors, including: ● raising pupil motivation; ● improving pupil behaviour; ● enhancing communications both within and between schools; ● enhancing assessment methods and their impact; ● reducing teacher workload; ● increasing efficiency in school management.What the research says about ICT and whole-school improvementICT, Technology, Professional Practice, VLE, Communities, Collaboration, Teaching and Learning, Assessment, MIS, Parents
2003The BBC digital curriculum service will provide a multimedia online resource, consisting of content and a limited learning platform. It will be based on current UK curricula and intended for use by learners at home and school. It will be formally launched in January 2006.ICT, amenability and the BBC digital curriculum service in England: Becta's report to the DCMSICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, VLE
2003This pilot project is beginning to identify real value in the use of small, handheld computing devices for both teachers and pupils in English schools. This report, compiled for the Education Show in March 2003, sets out some insights into the progress made so far, and identifies potential avenues for further investigation and ways in which to ensure that these are worthwhile.Handheld Computers (PDAs) in SchoolsICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, ESafety, Parents, Collaboration
2003The evidence from the research literature shows that teachers’ pedagogies and pedagogical reasoning influence their uses of ICT and thereby pupils’ attainment.ICT and Pedagogy: A review of the research literatureICT, Technology, Research, Attainment, Collaboration, Professional Practice, Pedagogy, Primary, Secondary, STEM, Learner Voice, VLE
2003The ICT Research Bursaries were funded by the DfES and managed by Becta. They highlight the importance that the Government places on the role of independent research in informing policy and practice relating to the use of ICT in education.ICT Research Bursaries: A compendium of research reportsICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Parents, VLE, Primary, Secondary, Communities, Professional Development, STEM
2003The Laptops for Teachers initiative (LfT) launched by the Department for Education and Skills in Spring 2002, aimed to increase teachers’ and headteachers’ access to computers. In the first two years of the initiative (2002–2004), the Government provided £120 million for the purchase of laptops. Minimum technical specifications for the first year were specified by the DfES to ensure that laptops of an acceptable standard were supplied to headteachers and teachers. LEAs allocated the laptops to their schools. The evaluation focuses on the first year of the Initiative and thus the impact of later changes, including increased Government investment and introduction of the teachers’ National Agreement1 for workload are not accounted for.Laptops for Teachers: An Evaluation of the First Year of the InitiativeICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, VLE, Professional Practice, Assessment, Management, ESafety, Sustainability
2003In July 2002 the published report of the Post-16 e-learning Task Force entitled Get on with IT stressed the important role that ICT has to play in post-16 education, recommending that the concept of Curriculum Online for Schools should be expanded into post-16 learning in the form of NLN Online. The report defined e-learning as learning with the help of information and communications technology tools. These tools may include the Internet, intranets, wireless networking, PC (personal computer) based technologies, handheld computers, interactive TV and also the use of e-technology to support traditional delivery, for example, using electronic whiteboards and video conferencing.Paving the Way (Has missing front pages)ICT, Technology, VLE, Further Education, Mobile, Teaching and Learning, Knowledge Creation, Assessment
2003This report is part of a series of publications aimed at exploring the relationship between schools’ use of ICT and pupils’ achievement in national tests and examinations. It builds on earlier publications and complements reports published in the DfES/Becta research and evaluation series. It examines the relationship between the use of ICT and educational standards based on data obtained on schools from Ofsted inspections for the academic year 2000 – 01. This is further supplemented by test and examinations data from QCA for the same period . Primary Schools – ICT and Standards: An analysis of national data from Ofsted and QCA by BectaICT, Technology, Primary, Research, Leadership, Teaching and Learning, STEM, Parents, Inclusion
2003The report's findings are based on data obtained from Ofsted inspections for the academic year 2000-01. This is further supplemented by test and examinations data from QCA for the same period. Where relevant, the report makes comparisons with data from datasets covering September 1998 to July 1999, and January to July 2000 in order to verify the findings of earlier analyses. The findings from these earlier analyses have been verified by analysis of a new sample of 2,582 schools receiving a full inspection in the academic year 2000-01.Primary Schools – ICT and Standards: An analysis of national data from Ofsted and QCA by BectaICT, Technology, Primary, Research, Leadership, Teaching and Learning, STEM, Parents, Inclusion
2003Leadership teams in LEAs have a key role in supporting their schools in the use of ICT for learning, teaching and management. LEAs that had a successful fsted inspection have some common characteristics in their development of ICT in schools, and this report identifies some highlights of current practice in: • vision and planning, • implementation of support, training and infrastructure and resources; • monitoring and evaluation. The outcomes provide clear guidance and pose some challenging questions for LEA leaders.Reflections on success: LEA support for ICT in schoolsICT, Technology, LEA, Professional Development, Evaluation
2003For the past three years Becta has conducted extensive research analysis aimed at exploring the relationship between schools’ use of ICT and pupils’ achievement in national tests and examinations. This leaflet presents key findings from the report Secondary Schools – ICT and Standards.Secondary Schools – ICT and standards: An analysis of national data from Ofsted and QCA by BectaICT, Technology, Secondary, Leadership
2003The following report is drawn from two national, qualitative studies by the author, carried out over four years and involving over 200 skilled computer users in the UK teaching force.1 The studies explored good practice in the use of ICT in 12 separate curriculum subjects. A report on the use of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in art and designICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Professional Practice, Primary, Secondary
2003There are many resources on the web that can be used to improve the quality of geography teaching in the primary school. Some resources can be used directly by pupils, whilst others assist the teacher in producing resources to suit specific needs.Using web-based resources in Primary GeographyICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2003Using web-based resources is one of a number ways to contribute to a pupil’s entitlement to ICT in music lessons. Using ICT in music lessons is not statutory at Key Stage 1, but the National Curriculum Order for music does encourage worthwhile use of ICT.Using web-based resources in Primary MusicICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2003The internet has many useful resources to support the teaching of RE in primary schools. You can bookmark these resources and use them offline, or download and adapt them to meet the subject-specific objectives for teaching and learning. The examples given here describe a number of lessons in which information and communication technology (ICT) is used effectively to support the teaching and learning of RE at Key Stages 1 and 2.Using web-based resources in Primary REICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2003There are many resources on the web that can be used to improve the quality of geography teaching in the primary school. Some resources can be used directly by pupils, whilst others assist the teacher in producing resources to suit specific needs. The lessons and examples here have been selected to illustrate the variety of types of web-based resources and the ways in which they can be used effectively to support the teaching of geography in Key Stages 1 and 2.They can be bookmarked, downloaded and used offline or adapted for specific requirements. There may be other sites which could serve a similar purpose – using a searchable database such as Curriculum Online or The Teacher Resource Exchange will help you to find them.Using web-based resources in Primary GeographyICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2003The internet has many useful resources and applications that can support primary history teaching. You can bookmark them and use them offline, or download them and adapt them to meet specific learning objectives. The examples given here describe a number of lessons in which ICT is used effectively to support the teaching of history in Key Stages 1 and 2. In some of the examples, applications are used with a projector and whiteboard or a large screen monitor in whole-class teaching, whilst others are used by groups of children, working independently or with a teacher. In some cases pupils work in pairs discussing and sharing ideas with their partner.Using web-based resources in Primary HistoryICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2003As they progress through primary school, pupils should develop skills in using a wide range of ICT tools. Most of the ICT curriculum at Key Stages 1 and 2 can be taught using a set of basic software tools.Using web-based resources in Primary ICT (Doc pages out of order)ICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2003Many useful resources to support the literacy lesson can be accessed using the internet. These can then be bookmarked and set to be used offline. Some resources can be downloaded and adapted by the teacher to meet the teaching and learning of specific key objectives. The examples given here describe a number of lessons in which ICT is used effectively to support the teaching and learning of literacy to children in Key Stages 1 and 2.Using web-based resources in Primary LiteracyICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2003Many good mathematics applications can be accessed using the internet. These can be bookmarked and set to be used offline. Some can be downloaded and adapted by the teacher to meet specific learning objectives. The examples given here describe a number of lessons in which ICT is used effectively to support the teaching of mathematics to children in Key Stages 1 and 2.Using web-based resources in Primary MathematicsICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2003Using web-based resources is one of a number ways to contribute to a pupil’s entitlement to ICT in music lessons. Using ICT in music lessons is not statutory at Key Stage 1, but the National Curriculum Order for music does encourage worthwhile use of ICT. There is a statutory requirement to use ICT in music at Key Stage 2 and it should be used to ‘(recall), capture, change and combine sounds’. The examples given here describe a number of lessons in which web-based materials were used to help Key Stage 1 and 2 pupils to develop their musical knowledge and understanding.Using web-based resources in Primary MusicICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2003The internet has many useful resources to support the teaching of RE in primary schools. You can bookmark these resources and use them offline, or download and adapt them to meet the subject-specific objectives for teaching and learning. The examples given here describe a number of lessons in which information and communication technology (ICT) is used effectively to support the teaching and learning of RE at Key Stages 1 and 2.Using web-based resources in Primary REICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2003The internet has many useful resources to support primary science. You can bookmark them and use them offline, or download them and adapt them to meet the teaching and learning of specific key objectives. The examples given here describe a number of lessons in which ICT is used effectively to support the teaching and learning of science to children in Key Stages 1 and 2.The examples given here are just that – examples of how the sites could be used. You will have your own ideas on how a site may be used which will be just as relevant as the examples given here.Using web-based resources in Primary ScienceICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2003The internet has many useful resources to support primary science. You can bookmark them and use them offline, or download them and adapt them to meet the teaching and learning of specific key objectives. The examples given here describe a number of lessons in which ICT is used effectively to support the teaching and learning of science to children in Key Stages 1 and 2.The examples given here are just that – examples of how the sites could be used. You will have your own ideas on how a site may be used which will be just as relevant as the examples given here.Using web-based resources in Primary ScienceICT, Technology, Primary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2003ICT can also be used to enhance individual learning, with structured tasks and activities focused on scientific ideas. ICT can be used just as effectively in the plenary session where children can demonstrate and explain what they have learned and display their work.Using web-based resources in Secondary ScienceICT, Technology, Secondary, Resources, Teaching and Learning
2003This report is based on an analysis of available research about the motivational effects of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) on students’ commitment to and engagement in learning. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about ICT and motivationICT, Technology, Research, Mobile, VLE, Immersive Learning, Teaching and Learning
2003This report is based on an analysis of available research about the uses made of network technologies and their impacts on teaching and learning. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about network technologies in teaching and learningICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Collaboration
2003This report is based on an analysis of current research about the use of interactive whiteboards in teaching and learning. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about interactive whiteboardsICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Visual Learning
2003This report is based on an analysis of research into the use made of video conferencing and its impact on teaching and learning. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about video conferencing in teaching and learningICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning
2003This report is based on an analysis of available research about school leadership and the effective integration of ICT in schools. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about strategic leadership and management of ICT in schoolsICT, Technology, Research, Leadership, Management, Professional Development, Teaching and Learning
2003This report is based on an analysis of available research into the use of ICT within Initial Teacher Training (ITT). . It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about ICT and initial teacher trainingICT, Technology, Research, Professional Practice
2003This report is based on an analysis of current research about the barriers to the effective use of information and communications technology (ICT) in teaching. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about barriers to the use of ICT in teachingICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning
2003This briefing is based on an analysis of available research about how information and communications technology (ICT) can support inclusive practice in schools. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about ICT supporting special educational needs (SEN) and inclusionICT, Technology, Research, SEN, Inclusion, Teaching and Learning, Professional Practice, Personalised Learning
2003This report is based on an analysis of available research for ICT support for schools. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about ICT support in schoolsICT, Technology, Research, LEA
2003This briefing is based on an analysis of available research about the use of ICT with home-school links. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about ICT and home-school linksICT, Technology, Research, Parents, Teaching and Learning
2003This report is based on an analysis of current research about the use of digital video (DV) in teaching and learning. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about digital video in teaching and learning ICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Visual Learning, Literacy
2003This report is based on an analysis of current research about how primary and secondary teachers are using ICT in the English curriculum. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about using ICT in EnglishICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Primary, Secondary, Collaboration, Personalised Learning, Literacy, Assessment
2003This briefing is based on an analysis of available research about primary and secondary teachers’ use of ICT in maths. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about using ICT in MathsICT, Technology, Research, STEM, Teaching and Learning, Collaboration, Mobile, Numeracy, Professional Practice
2003This report is based on an analysis of current research about the use of ICT in the teaching and learning of science. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about using ICT in ScienceICT, Technology, Research, STEM, Teaching and Learning, Mobile, Visual Learning, Professional Practice
2003This report is based on an analysis of available research about ICT and whole-school improvement. It summarises the key findings and suggests resources for further reading.What the research says about ICT and whole-school improvementICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Parents, Leadership
2003This report based on an analysis of available research about ICT support for schools. It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading. What the research says about ICT support for schoolsICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Support, LEA
2003This report based on an analysis of current research about the barriers to the effective use of information and communications technology (ICT) in teaching. It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about barriers to the use of ICT in teachingICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Barriers
2003This report based on an analysis of current research about the use of digital video (DV) in teaching and learning. It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about digital video in teaching and learning.ICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Visual Learning, Literacy
2003This report based on an analysis of current research about how primary and secondary teachers are using ICT in the English curriculum. It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about using ICT in EnglishICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Literacy, Primary, Secondary, Collaboration, Assessment
2003This briefing is based on an analysis of available research about the use of ICT with home-school links. It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about ICT and home-school links ICT, Technology, Research, Parents, Teaching and Learning, Mobile
2003This briefing is based on an analysis of available research about how information and communications technology (ICT) can support inclusive practice in schools. It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about ICT supporting special educational needs (SEN) and inclusionICT, Technology, Research, Inclusion, SEN, Teaching and Learning, VLE, Communities, Personalised Learning
2003This report based on an analysis of available research into the use of ICT within initial teacher training (ITT). It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about ICT and initial teacher trainingICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Professional Practice, VLE
2003This briefing is based on an analysis of available research about primary and secondary teachers’ use of ICT in maths. It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about using ICT in MathsICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, STEM, Numeracy, Collaboration, Professional Practice, Primary, Secondary
2003This report based on an analysis of available research about the motivational effects of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) on students’ commitment to and engagement in learning. It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about ICT and motivationICT, Technology, Research, Personalised Learning, VLE
2003This report based on an analysis of available research about the uses made of network technologies and their impacts on teaching and learning. It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about network technologies in teaching and learningICT, Technology, Research, Teaching and Learning, Collaboration
2003This report based on an analysis of current research about the use of ICT in the teaching and learning of science. It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about using ICT in ScienceICT, Technology, Research, STEM, Teaching and Learning, Visual Learning, Mobile
2003This report based on an analysis of available research about school leadership and the effective integration of ICT in schools. It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about strategic leadership and management of ICT in schoolsICT, Technology, Research, Leadership, Management, Professional Development
2003This report based on an analysis of research into the use of video conferencing and its impact on teaching and learning. . It summarises the key findings and suggests sources for further reading.What the research says about video conferencing in teaching and learningICT, Technology, Research, VLE, Teaching and Learning, Collaboration
2002ImpaCT2 is one of a number of projects commissioned by the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) and managed by Becta with the aim of evaluating the progress of the ICT in Schools Programme. This summary reports primarily on the outcomes of Strand 3.ImpaCT2: Learning at home and school: Case studiesICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Professional Development, Literacy, SEN
2002ImpaCT2 is one of the most comprehensive investigations into the impact of information and communications technology (ICT) on educational attainment so far conducted in the UK. This summary reports on the key findings from Strand 1 of the ImpaCT2 study.ImpaCT2: The Impact of Information and Communication Technologies on Pupil Learning and AttainmentICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Attainment, Primary, Secondary
2002ImpaCT2 is one of a number of projects commissioned by the Department for Education and Skills and managed by Becta with the aim of evaluating the progress of the ICT in Schools Programme. This summary reports primarily on the outcomes of Strand 2.ImpaCT2: Pupils’ and Teachers’ Perceptions of ICT in the Home, School and CommunityICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Learner Voice, Primary, Secondary
ndThis PDF provides an overview of the leadership and management element of the Self-review framework. The descriptors will help you decide where you are in your ICT development.Leadership and Management: Self-review frameworkICT, Technology, Leadership, Management, Self-Review Framework, ESafety, Evaluation
ndThis PDF provides an overview of the professional development element of the Self-review framework. The descriptors will help you decide where you are in your ICT development.Professional development: Self-review frameworkICT, Technology, Self-Review Framework, Professional Development, Collaboration, Evaluation
ndThis PDF provides an overview of the assessment of ICT capability element of the Self-review framework. The descriptors will help you decide where you are in your ICT developmentAssessment of IT CapabilityICT, Assessment, Self-Review Framework
ndWith literally billions of pages of information, the internet can sometimes appear overwhelming. So it’s important to help your children understand how best to find the information they want so they don’t waste time or become frustrated.Here’s how….to search smartly for informationSearch
ndThe internet is an instant source of valuable information on subjects children study, or take an interest in. It is impossible, however, to ensure everything on the internet is good quality.Here’s how...to evaluate information online (Leaflet)Technology, Parents, ESafety
ndEncouraging your children to follow up their favourite hobbies and interests with online activities has several benefits.Here’s how….. to expand your child’s interests (Leaflet)ICT, Technology, Parents, Literacy
ndThis PDF provides an overview of the leadership and management element of the Self-review framework. The descriptors will help you decide where you are in your ICT developmentLeadership and Management: Self-review frameworkICT, Technology, Leadership, Management, Self-Review Framework, ESafety
ndThis PDF provides an overview of the learning element of the Self-review framework. The descriptors will help you decide where you are in your ICT developmentLearning: Self-Review FrameworkICT, Technology, Teaching and Learning, Critical Evaluation, Self-Review Framework
ndYou know the excitement and educational value of visiting museums and how they can inspire young minds. But it isn’t always possible to go and visit them in person. Here’s how...to visit a museum without leaving home (Leaflet)Technology, Parents
ndThis pack suggests a variety of simple ways for you to: • get more involved in your child’s learning; • engage more with their school ; • help Next Generation Learning become a reality for every child. The choice is yours. Try what suits you.Here’s how…you can support your child’s learning with technology: Next Generation LearningICT, Technology, Parents, Mobile, ESafety, Teaching and Learning
ndThis PDF provides an overview of the planning element of the Self-review framework. The descriptors will help you decide where you are in your ICT developmentPlanning: Self-review frameworkICT, Technology, Self-Review Framework, Teaching and Learning, Parents, Inclusion, ESafety, Leadership
ndThis PDF provides an overview of the resources element of the Self-review framework. The descriptors will help you decide where you are in your ICT development.Resources: Self-Review FrameworkICT, Technology, Self-Review Framework, Learning Environments and Spaces, Sustainability, VLE, Management, ESafety, Evaluation
ndThis pack suggests a variety of simple ways for you to: • get more involved in your child’s learning; • engage more with their school; • help Next Generation Learning become a reality for every child.; The choice is yours. Try what suits you.Here’s how…. to share the success of Next Generation Learning in school (Leaflet)Technology, Parents
ndThe internet offers unlimited resources to support your child’s learning – from written information to images to music. It is important, however, that they understand how to use the content they find responsiblyHere’s how...to teach your child to use online content responsibly (Leaflet)ICT, Technology, Parents, ESafety
ndBeing safe online and behaving responsibly are important aspects of using the internet effectively. Your children may seem ultra-confident with using technology, but there’s still a lot you can teach them.Here’s how...to help your child use the internet responsibly (Activity Pack)ICT, Technology, ESafety, Parents
ndOnline communities offer children varied opportunities for developing knowledge and interests as well as important social and communication skills. As with most things, however, children need to behave appropriately, be aware of potential issues and know how to deal with them. This card gives you a quick overviewHere’s how...to make the most of online communitiesICT, Technology, Communities, Parents, ESafety
ndBeing safe online and behaving responsibly are important aspects of using the internet effectively. Your children may seem ultra-confident with using technology, but there’s still a lot you can teach them. Here’s how...to help your child use the internet responsibly (Leaflet)ICT, Technology, ESafety, Parents